Big Stories

POZ Video Premiere: Tommy Boys - “Estate Sale”

by Zack Zarrillo - Apr 18, 2014

Tommy Boys will be releasing a new full-length later this year that’s being recorded by Sam Pura (The Story So Far, Basement). The release will come out via Other People Records, a label run by Tom from Stray From The Path and Jesse from Stick To Your Guns. PropertyOfZack is happy to be debuting a new video today from the band for a song called “Estate Sale. Watch the video below after the jump. 

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Albums Out This Week: Record Store Day

by Zack Zarrillo - Apr 18, 2014

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Record Store Day is tomorrow, April 19th, and we’re excited to say goodbye to the money in our wallets. There are over 500 releases that can be seen here, but we’re highlighting just a few more special releases that are coming out tomorrow. Check out our RSD Preview here and some more albums coming out below!

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POZ Review: Pup - Pup

by Zack Zarrillo - Apr 18, 2014

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by Adrienne Fisher, edited by Erik van Rheenen

There’s a fine line between genius and insanity, and Toronto’s Pup seems to be stuck somewhere in the middle – fortunately for their debut self-titled, they’ve held nothing back as they try to figure out which of those they are. The album’s 10 tracks of dizzying rock n’ roll find wells of influence in all corners of the rockosphere, from the blitzy punk-ska fury of fellow Canadians the Flatliners, to the swaggering, almost-too-easy melodies of a band like Cage the Elephant. Much like the devilish, metallic grille that graces the front cover of the record, the songs are shiny and tough, and it’s hard to recall an album that’s come out in recent memory that found such a relentless spirit with this kind of ease.

Opener “Guilt Trip” launches right into the fray, with an attitude that I imagine to be somewhere between deranged carnival ride and the Running of the Bulls. The rhythm changes tracks without warning, and carries you around some funky time signatures, but at every turn there’s a new hook, or a vicious guitar lick. In fact, the guitar work throughout the entire thing sounds like it was meant to be played with one’s teeth in a fit of live intensity, with the riffs furious and catchy enough that they bite. The production leans hard on the treble, drawing out distinct and boisterous tones in the guitars that give the record a life of its own - the scrappy ambition and intensity that comes out in the songs can be boiled down simply fucking awesome.

While the entire record aggressively pushes the pedal to the steel (mostly) without reprieve, that’s not to say that the craft has gone out the window in favor of musical intimidation. The song arrangements on this debut are creative and interesting, with parts surfacing that range anywhere from 50s-ish doo-wop (“Mabu”) to 90s SoCal ska (“Dark Days”). The sprawling, slowed-down “Yukon” feels like the band musically reminiscing about the first time they heard “While My Guitar Gently Weeps,” especially with the last minute or two of the song drifting off into unhinged guitar acrobatics. But the dragging rhythm and dark, bluesy aesthetic certainly pair well with lyrics that spin a tale of tundra-wandering, people-abandoning hopelessness (“search forever, but you won’t find your gold / the river swallowed it whole / in the Yukon valley / where you left me on my knees”). 

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POZ RSD Preview: Our Must Have Vinyl Grabs

by Zack Zarrillo - Apr 17, 2014

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Record Store Day arrives on this Saturday, April 19th.  Our wallets may not be ready, but our hearts certainly are. There are a great amount of releases coming out this year for the music holiday (around 500), and we wanted to start a Discussion  on the records that PropertyOfZack members are looking forward to most. Check out our list below and feel free to reblog with some of your most anticipated Record Store Day releases!

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fun. - Point & Light
We’re currently living in a world where there will never again be more people that have heard of The Format than fun. Some people have trouble dealing with that, but it has never not filled me with joy. Seeing three individuals (and hey, Will Noon too!) travel the world and hang out with Barack Obama at special events is a victory our community should never forget about.

However, that doesn’t mean I no longer cherish those smaller times between The Format and Steel Train’s end and that interesting period where fun. was opening up for artists like Jack’s Mannequin and Manchester Orchestra. Point & Light, a Record Store Day release that features demos from Aim & Ignite, makes me excited to think about that time again and to know the band hasn’t forgotten about it either. - Zack Zarrillo

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Bayside - Time Has Come
Bayside killed it on Cult, their newest album and Hopeless Records debut. It’s easily one of the best releases so far this year, and stands out in the band’s already impressive discography. So it comes as no surprise that Bayside is keeping the momentum going this Record Store Day with a 7” featuring exultant single “Time Has Come” and a brand new exclusive track titled “Indiana.” Super limited and sure to sell out quickly, any Bayside fan would be crazy not to hunt this one down. - Becky Kovach

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Jay-Z / Linkin Park - Collision Course

I ordered a frappuccino, where’s my fucking frappuccino? 

Such begins the masterpiece that is Collision Course, a glorious, sparkling clusterfuck of a six-song album recorded and released by Jay-Z and Linkin Park under the guidance of MTV’s old “Ultimate Mash-Ups” feature. Here’s the thing about the mid-2000s, often referred to as The Lost Years by ME, since I was a terrible middle-schooler, mash-ups were very common and some of them were fantastic. For proof, I offer this and tell you that if you need more proof then get lost, loser. (P.S., this is a weird thing to read in 2014.)

But Collision Course isn’t a normal mash-up record, it’s much more special. Jay-Z and LP’s Mike Shinoda decided they weren’t content with how the mash-ups were sounding by simply remixing the audio files, so they got everyone in a studio and actually re-recorded instrumental portions and vocal tracks just for this one-off release. It only took them four days to do it in the studio because dopeness came easy in 2004. It’s also awesome because the songs end up with a “live” feel because they didn’t cut random comments out of the beginning / end of songs. LP and Jay-Z performed shows together as well to support the release. This is truly something thatonly could have happened in 2004, and we better be damn happy that it did, because there was no way that the stars would ever align for this again. 

I am a very big proponent of this release and my Twitter account proves it, but I am too lazy to look up links to old tweets. It identifies a special portion of time when CDs were still selling well (Collision Course has sold over fucking 5 million copies worldwide, I mean holy shit) and when major labels were perhaps a little more willing to let weird shit go down. Napster was also a very big deal, which I am reminded of today, because my friend burned me a copy of his illegal download and he accidentally downloaded the CLEAN VERSION OF THIS THING and I still have all the curse words faded out of the version in my iTunes. 

Collision Course is also one of the most obvious and famous points of collaboration between a major rock band (rap-rock, nu-metal, whatever man) and a major,major rapper. I am a huge supporter of today’s punk and emo community, but one thing that mainstream EDM and hip-hop have over this scene is the collaborations they do. At any given moment, an immensely talented up-and-coming rapper can get into a studio with someone’s favorite DJ and they bust out a collab song in 24 hours. That doesn’t happen in the punk and emo world, and to some extent that makes sense and is understandable. But from a fan’s perspective, imagine how cool and weird it would be to hear The Wonder Years and Into It. Over It. record a random song together on Evan Weiss’ off day in Philadelphia. You’d buy that 7” single.

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POZ Interview: We Butter The Bread With Butter

by Zack Zarrillo - Apr 17, 2014

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PropertyOfZack Senior Writer Jesse Richman sat down with We Butter The Bread With Butter at SXSW a month ago. We chatted with the band about SXSW, their recent US tour, their new album, pushing into the US, and more. Check out the full interview below!

POZ: Can I get your names and what you do in the band?
MN: My name is Marcel [Neumann], I am the guitar player and songwriter of the band We Butter The Bread With Butter.
PB: My name is Paul [Barztsch], and I am the singer.
 
POZ: So is this you guys’ first time at SXSW?
MN: Yeah, the first time. We’ve played our own show [in Austin previously], but this is the first time.
POZ: When did you get into town?
MN: Just today, in the morning. We walked around, tried to get a look at everything.
POZ: Did you get a chance to see any bands? Or will you while you’re here?
MN: Maybe after we load in. Right now we’re just walking around, seeing all the exotic stuff.
POZ: It’s kind of crazy here!
 
POZ: So you guys are just at the very tail end of a tour with Lions Lions and Honour Crest. How’s that been going?
MN: Very good. The beginning was quite hard because we hit all the blizzards on the eastern side [of the US]. We cancelled a show in, I think, Iowa, because our bus couldn’t move.
POZ: I live in New York, it’s been one hell of a winter.
MN: But since we’ve been on the west coast everything is awesome. The shows have been great.
 
POZ: How has the audience been? Have the fans reacted well? Just because I know you guys are kind of different from what Lions Lions and Honour Crest do.
MN: Yes. This is our goal, to be different from anyone else. But their audience was awesome. Seeing them try to sing our songs in German. I don’t know why but they really get into the language. It’s fun.
POZ: Do you find that you guys have a lot of fans of your own over here? Or is it more winning over the other bands’ fans at this point.
MN: I mean, this is our headliner tour.
POZ: Well, yeah. That’s fair.
MN: So most of the fans have been there for us.
POZ: I guess I just ask because you really haven’t toured the US much.
MN: This is our second tour [here]. It’s very interesting because the audience is very different from Germany, but it’s great to see people come out so far away from our home. They knew our music for six or seven years. This is very amazing. Awesome.
 
POZ: Ok, so the album [Goldkinder] came out last August I believe? Was that a worldwide release? I know you did it independently.
MN: It was a worldwide release, with some day’s difference — the 9th in Germany, the 10th in…
POZ: So, pretty close. So it’s been out for a while, are you happy with how it’s been received at this point?
MN: Oh yeah, because we knew that this record was going in another direction than we did before, and we knew that a lot of people wouldn’t like it. But we also tried to reach out to a very different kind of audience, and somehow, it started working. The audience is different. They’re more into music, and not just into seeing another scene metalcore band. It’s more about being real fans of one band’s music. It was a very risky step, but it was worth it.
PB: The crowd changed really hard. The first time we played here, we had a lot of “mosh kids” and hardcore kids. This time, [the crowds are] full of party people. They want to party with us. It’s really cool.
MN: Full of “rock and roll people”.
 
POZ: Was that something you were conscious of when you were writing the album, that you wanted to take that turn? Or is it just how it came out.
MN: It was totally… Like, we didn’t want to do something that does not express ourselves. Just doing the same stuff we did on the last two records wouldn’t satisfy us as musicians, so we just did what we really wanted to do. Yeah! That was kind of the writing process, yeah.
PB: This music is 100% us.
MN: I think it’s more We Butter than ever before. It’s really what we love to do, and we don’t care what others think about it.

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POZ 100 Words Or Less Podcast: Matt Carter (Emery)

by Zack Zarrillo - Apr 17, 2014

Our 100 Words Or Less Podcast with host Ray HarkinsEmery is back with Matt Carter of Emery. Ray and Matt how to not start a band, being late to the game, how Christian music can very often be terrible, and more.

Follow the podcast on Twitter here, subscribe to the podcast on iTunes here, and stream the new episode with Ray and Matt below!

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POZ Interview: Blacklist Royals

by Zack Zarrillo - Apr 16, 2014

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PropertyOfZack Senior Writer Jesse Richman sat down with Blacklist Royals at SXSW a month ago. We chatted with the band about SXSW, Die Young With Me, changing musical directions, heavier content, touring, and more. Check out the interview below!

POZ: First of all, can I get your names and what you do in the band?
NR: I’m Nat [Rufus], I sing and play guitar.
RR: I’m Rob [Rufus], I play drums.
 
POZ: You guys just got off the stage at the Blind Pig [at Big Picture Media’s SXSW showcase]. How did the set go?
RR: I thought it was alright, man. South By is kind of a different animal as far as playing shows goes, because it’s like…
NR: It’s just like get up, play for ten minutes, get off. You know what I mean? We’re playing a bunch of shows and stuff. But I thought it was cool. It was by far the best show we’ve played down here.
RR: Yeah, it was fun.
NR: And knowing what our schedule is tomorrow, it’s going to be the best. [Laughs]
POZ: What’s it look like? How many are you doing tomorrow?
NR: We’re just doing one, but we have to be there at 9am.
POZ: Is that like, a radio thing?
RR: With Lisa Marie Presley!
POZ: Ohhhhh-kay… How did that happen?
NR: I don’t know how anything happens these days, dude, I mean, to be honest.
RR: I mean, don’t you see the natural pairing of us and Lisa Marie Presley?
POZ: Honestly, I saw Lisa Marie on the SXSW schedule and I was really tempted to go see it just because.
NR: Oh bro, I gotta get a picture with her ass.
POZ: I don’t know what she’s doing here, but I kind of want to see.
NR: I guess she’s singing? Maybe?
RR: And we’re the opening act!
POZ: Get some Whole Foods breakfast, it’ll be great.
RR: That’s what I’m hoping! They have an open bar, can we get, like, an open salad bar in this motherfucker? Because we’re leaving right afterwards. Whatever. It should be good. I thought this afternoon was really fun. The showcase was great. All of the other bands were really good.
 
POZ: When did you guys get down here?
NR: We got down here like three days ago.
RR: Tuesday?
NR: Tuesday, yeah.
POZ: How many shows have you played so far.
NR: We’ve done shows every day we’ve been here. I think this was our third show, tomorrow’s four. Which isn’t a lot compared to what a lot of bands do. I know there are some bands down here playing, like, twelve fucking shows. But yeah, it was cool.
POZ: Have you had a chance to see any other bands?
RR: I’ve seen a couple, man. The days have usually been like, we play and then everybody kind of splits off. I’ve seen Dum Dum Girls a couple times. I saw Johnny Two Bags, he’s the guitarist for Social D[istortion], it’s his solo thing, it was awesome.
POZ: I didn’t even know he was here.
NR: It was great! It was actually all of Social D, and then their guitar tech — minus Mike Ness.
RR: But it was awesome, yeah.
NR: And I got to catch X the other day, they were awesome.
RR: Together Pangea was awesome.
POZ: I got to see X at Riot Fest this summer, they were so good.
NR: Oh bro! Fuckin’ John Doe up there, he is cool as hell! Dude, you missed out man. I mean, it was great. But yeah, we’ve all… Diamond Youth, we saw.
POZ: I saw them too.
NR: We’ve kinda been doing our thing. And then Two Cow Garage, I might catch them later. There’s a couple bands I want to see this afternoon.
 
POZ: You guys have done the SXSW thing before this year, right?
RR: Yeah, yeah.
POZ: So you knew what you were getting into.
RR: Yeah we did. It’s the first year we’ve had the wristbands. After that fucking horrible shit happened the other day [the drunk driving accident], we were kind of bummed, but then we were like, lets try and enjoy our lives and listen to fuckin’ music.
POZ: I was two blocks away seeing Against Me! when it all went down.
RR: Yeah I was at the Against Me! show.
POZ: Oh you were there? I was having a blast through the first part of the show, until all the text messages started coming in.
NR: I was at Mohawk [the venue in front of which the accident occurred], I reached this point where I said “holy shit, I’m too drunk, I need to leave and get food” and I did. And then right after, I saw that stuff. It really kind of put us all in a fucked up headspace the other day. I dunno, the whole thing was really pretty heavy to take in. But like you said, there’s nothing we can do now except try to live our lives.

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POZ Review: Punk Goes 90s Vol. II

by Zack Zarrillo - Apr 16, 2014

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by Caitlin DeWeese, edited by Erik van Rheenen

What is there to say about “Punk Goes 90s,Volume 2” besides the obvious: “There aren’t any punk bands on it?”
 
It is and has always been (at least recently) everyone’s complaint, and I think it gets said every time a new album in the series is released. There are no punk bands on it, and there never were, and there never will be. We know.
 
I was head over heels for Punk Goes Acoustic, and listened to Punk Goes Pop (the first one) for a small amount of time, but I never invested much time or many emotions (besides anger) in them besides that.
 
I expected nothing from this release and was both pleasantly surprised and absolutely disgusted. Here is my categorization of the tracks.
 
The Good:
Track 1: Get Scared- “My Own Worst Enemy” (Lit)
Track 4: The Color Morale- “Everlong” (Foo Fighters)
Track 6: Mayday Parade- “Comedown” (Bush)
Track 8: Yellowcard- “Today” (Smashing Pumpkins)
Track 9: Hands Like Houses- “Torn” (Natalie Imbruglia)
Track 12: Ice Kills Nine- “Good Riddance” (Green Day)
 
The Almost Good:
Track 5: Chunk! No, Captain Chunk!- “All Star” (Smash Mouth)
Track 10: The Ghost Inside- “Southtown” (POD)
 
The Crap:
Track 2: Memphis May Fire- “Interstate Love Song” (Stone Temple Pilots)
Track 3: Asking Alexandria- “Closer” (Nine Inch Nails)
Track 7: Motionless in White- “Du Hast” (Rammstein)
Track 11: Falling in Reverse- “Gangsta’s Paradise” (Coolio) 

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POZ Interview: No Somos Marineros

by Zack Zarrillo - Apr 15, 2014

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PropertyOfZack Senior Writer Jesse Richman sat down with No Somos Marineros at SXSW a month ago. We chatted with the band about SXSW, new recordings, their relationship with Topshelf, growing as a band, and more. Check out the interview below!

POZ: Just to start, can I get your names and what you do in the band?
CGS: I’m Carlos [González Soto], I play guitar and [I sing].
AP: I’m Andrés [Pérez], and I play drums.
OR: I’m Oscar [Rubio], and I play guitar.
GF: Gustavo [Farfán], bass.
 
POZ: So let me start this off by saying, I actually saw you guys last year at SXSW, at the Pearl St. Co-op, when you played over there. And I was really blown away — I thought you were fantastic. I went online to find more info and the one thing I discovered is that — probably because you’re Mexican — everything out there is in Spanish, and there is very little in English about you guys. So to start out I just want to ask the basics. How did you get together? Where are you from? How did you start playing your music?
CGS: We’re based in Mexico City, mostly. Andres and Oscar are friends that go way back; they’ve played together from a long time ago.
AP: Since we were like twelve or thirteen.
CGS: We met through some of our friends. Gustavo had another band. Julio [Muñoz], who’s not here, had another band also. So we all kind of knew each other through music and through other friends. We all got together and started playing.
POZ: How did you guys get into hardcore and emo and that kind of music?
AP: It’s the kind of music we’ve listened to since we were teenagers.
POZ: I guess I don’t even know, is there a big scene in Mexico City? Or in Mexico, generally?
CGS: Like ten, twelve years ago, there was this sprouting of emo in the city.
GF: Actually, that’s the band I played in ten years ago, and that’s where I met Carlos and Andres.
POZ: What was it called?
GF: Mayer.
CGS: Like Oscar Mayer. Like John Mayer [laughs].
GF: That was, like, the result of listening to Glassjaw and Thursday and all that stuff at that time. We liked 90s emo. I think this is just the result of listening to the same music.
CGS: There’s this band that’s kind of big in Mexico called Austin TV. And they kind of led the way in that sort of genre. But we all like their influences — not really Austin TV. Like Joan Of Arc, Cap’n Jazz, Owen…
POZ: So basically every band a Kinsella has been in [laughs].
AP: Fugazi…
CGS: We all come from sort of the same school. We all listened to pop punk, and then punk, and then hardcore and emo. Forwards and backwards. That’s how we got to this place.
 
POZ: So how long ago did you get together as No Somos Marineros?
CGS: 2010, we got together as No Somos Marineros. We became friends through another project, and through other friends, Light & Noise [a collective of photographers, musicians and designers; find out more at www.lightandnoise.tv], we’re all together in that. And we wanted to also make a band, so we started.
POZ: What have you released so far — I’m not sure how far back the music you’ve put out goes, I just know the newest stuff you have online.
CGS: A year and a half ago, we released a three song demo [Demo juvenil en vivo]…
POZ: Oh, was that the first thing you guys had released?
CGS: Yeah.
POZ: Ok, I wasn’t sure if there was more out there I didn’t know about.
CGS: No, nothing. Just home recordings of awful stuff, hours and hours of awful stuff [laughs]. And then we released the three song demo. And then we released a single [“Violencia River”] that got played on the radio and stuff. And we recently released a split EP with a Venezuelan band called The ZETA. Like the letter “z”. They played two songs, we played two songs, it was a live recording all the way. That’s our last thing.
 
POZ: Do you have plans for more recording coming up?
CGS: We do.
OR: Yeah, we plan to, after we finished SXSW… “South By”… we’ve been filming all along our trip. We’re planning a short video of tonight, and then record a song. That’ll be the next song.
CGS: We’re planning to release this song as a single, and then start to pre-produce what we want to hopefully become a full length.
POZ: Are you guys doing that on your own? Is there a label involved?
CGS: Kind of on our own. Light & Noise Records is starting, but that’s also us.
POZ: So your label is you!
OR: Exactly! [Laughs].
CGS: We’ve been approached by some other people back in Mexico who wanted to work with us, but it didn’t really work. So we’re just planning to keep it on our own.

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POZ Hit The Deck Preview: Our Must See Bands And Artists

by Zack Zarrillo - Apr 15, 2014

Hit The Deck kicks off this weekend, and PropertyOfZack Staff Writer Zac Lomas is preparing to take the festival by storm. Just in case you haven’t put together your schedule, we thought it’d be a great idea to put make a list of POZ’s Must See Bands And Artists that will be gracing the stage this weekend in the UK. Reblog and let us know who we need to see while we’re at Hit The Deck this weekend as well!

Brand New
I really shouldn’t need to write anything in order to sway all the Hit The Deck festivalgoers to catch Brand New’s set at this year’s festival.  Brand New shows have the propensity to sell out within seconds, so their recently announced string of European and UK festival dates is a godsend to anybody looking to catch the elusive emo rockers without totally breaking the bank.  While the recent increase in Brand New sightings gives promise that the Long Island group may actually write new music before we all die (young and save ourselves), one never knows when Jesse Lacey and company will slink back off to hibernation, making their performance at Hit The Deck nothing short of “can’t miss.”

The Front Bottoms
Brian Sella and Mathew Uychich may not have won POZ’s scandal-tinged March Sadness, claiming the coveted Kings of Emo crown, but that’s not to say they aren’t some of the most angst-riddled youngsters on the scene today.  This angst serves the duo well and has won them the adoration of fans worldwide; fans who have no reservations about going absolutely nuts over the all-too-honest lyrics of Sella.  I think it’s pretty safe to say that few people can create as much chaos with an acoustic guitar as Brian Sella and it would truly be a shame if you didn’t make that a part of your titillating Hit The Deck experience

Kvelertak
One can only have so much genre-bending fun before words like progressive-funk-shoegaze- blues seem a bit superfluous, but the amalgam of Nordic prog-metal known as Kvelertak make all of those hyphens seem worth it.  With a party ethos that makes pouring out an entire tankard of ale into a drinking-horn seem like the most reasonable thing to do, Kvelertak should have no problem setting off the shindig that is Hit The Deck. However, Kvelertak is not just about imbibing in mass quantities of fermented beverages, but also the intricately laced virtuoso of the guitar trio featuring Vidar Landa, Bjarte Lund Rolland, and Maciek Ofstad, all of whom are certain to dazzle in the live setting.

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POZ Review: Special Explosion - Art Of Mothering

by Zack Zarrillo - Apr 15, 2014

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by Caitlin DeWeese, edited by Erik van Rheenen

Two weeks ago, I had no idea who Special Explosion was or what they were about. Nothing. 
 
Cue SXSW. I happen upon their set while chilling at the Run For Cover Records showcase, and then find singer and guitarist Andy in my living room recording a Space Jam Session a few days later. My rapid and full inundation of Special Explosion was more than welcome, though — they have a great thing going.
 
Special Explosion started a few years ago in Seattle: just some friends jamming and hanging out. They are incredibly young to most, though not by scene standards where most bands can’t buy a beer at the bar they’re playing. Age isn’t stopping them though; the band has released an EP and a few singles, and now, as part of Topshelf Records, has released its first album, The Art of Mothering.
 
I am not going to spend this review telling you what other bands Special Explosion sounds like, or the technicalities of their writing, musically or otherwise. I want to tell you how this album makes me feel, and maybe it will help you decide if its something you would enjoy listening to.
 
The album kicks off with a 55 second track called “Avery.” It features Andy alone with his guitar and is something I probably would have dropped panties for in 9th grade. It’s honest, it’s short, it’s sweet, and a perfect introduction to Special Explosion’s aesthetic.

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POZ Interview: Analog Rebellion

by Zack Zarrillo - Apr 14, 2014

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PropertyOfZack Senior Writer Jesse Richman sat down with Analog Rebellion at SXSW a month ago. We chatted with the band about SXSW, their new album Ill’e Grande, recording some of it in Berlin, and more. Check out the interview below!

by Jesse Richman

POZ: First of all, can I get your names and what you do in the band?
DH: Daniel Hunter, I sing and I do stuff.
CH: Cory Harvard, I play drums.
[We were also joined by musician / executive producer / Dabbo Records owner Taylor Pile].
 
POZ: To start out, when did you get down here to SXSW?
DH: Last night at 4am, 5am.
POZ: Where were you coming from?
DH: We played a show in Dallas last night.
POZ: That’s home for you guys, right?
DH: Yeah. We wanted to drive in the middle of the night when there wasn’t any traffic.
POZ: Are you sticking around for South By, or are you just in and out?
DH: We had a show earlier today [Friday 3/14] and we have a show tomorrow, and then we’ll maybe stick around Sunday and leave Monday. Depends on who’s playing.
POZ: I imagine you’ve done the whole deal here before.
DH: Yeah, yeah. I try to avoid Austin during SXSW unless I’m here for business, I guess.
POZ: Are you planning on trying to check anyone out while you’re here?
DH: I don’t have any plans to, not really.
CH: Yeah, we haven’t seen a list of who’s playing in the next couple days.
TP: We’ve been so busy, but our good friends at The Syndicate [a marketing agency] have given us VIP to the Hype Hotel, so we’re planning on just hanging out there.
POZ: Doesn’t even matter who’s playing, it’ll be a good time.
TP: Yeah, I mean, free tacos, free booze, free fun.
CH: He knows way more about what’s going on than we do.
DH: Yeah we’re along for the ride [laughs].
TP: That’s kind of my thing.
 
POZ: So let’s talk about the new album, Ill’e Grande, it came out last month. First of all… how is it pronounced?
DH: I pronounce it “ill grahn-day”. Essentially, if you just have capital “i”, lowercase “l”, lowercase “l”, it just looks like three in Roman Numerals or something, so we just…stylized it I guess.
POZ: Is there a story behind that name?
DH: Well the reason it starts with “i” is because I name my albums alphabetically, chronologically. So my my first album is Ancient ElectronsBesides, NothingCavanaugh, Something. I’m on “i” now, so it had to start with “i”. It’s kind of a hard one! [Laughs]
POZ: Does the name have a particular meaning?
DH: I was going to write an album about a misunderstood school bully named Ill’e Grande, but we really only did one song about it. [Laughs].
POZ: But the name stuck.
DH: Yeah.
CH: It was the driving force behind the record.
 
POZ: You recorded this thing in Berlin, is that right?
DH: Some in Berlin, some of it in Brooklyn, some of it in Dallas.
POZ: How did Berlin happen? Why Berlin?
TP: I originally went there with my girlfriend. I own a record label, it’s called Dabbo Records. I met some good friends in Berlin and they took me to this abandoned NSA listening station. We got to the very top of it, and the dome at the top was this very big dome where a satellite used to be, but it was all gutted, from when the Wall fell. And I clapped, and the delay was like ten seconds. I was like “I have to make music here,” and the first person I thought of was Daniel, because Daniel has such an amazing voice. I was like “I’ve got to get Daniel here!” Two months later, we were there making music, and we started our relationship as musicians and friends.
DH: Buddies.
TP: After that, we went to Brooklyn and really got down drums and everything. It’s impossible to record everything in an abandoned NSA listening station, let’s be real.
POZ: Was it tough lugging gear up there and stuff?
DH: I mean, we didn’t bring that much gear.
CH: It was kind of a minimal setup.
DH: But even the gear we did bring was a pain in the ass. We brought everything except for water.
CH: [Laughs] yeah, we were really thirsty!
DH: Right before we did that one take, my mouth was like… sand.
TP: But at the tower, they have security there, and we didn’t let them know what we were doing, so a couple of times they came up to check on us and we had to tear everything down. We had kind of a lookout. So within five minutes, we had to get all our gear torn down.
POZ: How long were you guys up there? Just for a day?
DH: Maybe four or five hours?
TP: Four or five hours. We actually had a person at the top and a person at the bottom with a walkie-talkie. So if the security guards were about to come up, we had to tear down all our stuff and make it look like we were checking out the place, and then once they went back down we had to rebuild it. It was actually quite frustrating.
POZ: Yeah, that sounds like a pain. I know you’re very experienced with the home recording thing, so I imagine you at least have a rig that’s easy to set up and go real quick, and you know what you’re doing.
DH: It was a simple rig, but even a simple rig is complicated in a place like that.

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POZ Interview: NGHBRS

by Zack Zarrillo - Apr 14, 2014

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PropertyOfZack Staff Writer Ali Killian sat down with NGHBRS at SXSW a month ago. We chatted with the band about SXSW, a year since Twenty One Rooms, their very neat Instagram-based music video, new music, and more. Check out the interview below! 
by Ali Killian, edited by Ashley Aron

POZ: So first, let me get what you guys do in the band.
Eric: My name is Eric and I play bass.
Tommy: I’m Tommy and I play guitar.
Ian: My name’s Ian. I sing and play keyboards.
Jordan: Jordan. I play drums.
 
POZ: So how’s South By been treating you guys so far?
Tommy: Great!
Ian: Awesome!
Jordan: We’ve been having a great time.
POZ: When did you get in?
Eric: Monday night, yeah.
 
POZ: You’ve played a couple shows so far. How did those go?
Tommy: Great! They were a lot of fun. The first one was right in the window of The Aquarium on Sixth Street, and that was a lot of fun. It was a very personal-type show except it was really packed in. There were people coming off the street when were playing; it was really good vibes. The whole city is like that right now, just partying.
Ian: Music everywhere, all the time.
 
POZ: Have you gotten to check out any performances for yourselves?
Eric: Yeah, last night we were just walking around, we caught a little bit of Lucius, really cool band. Then were just walking, just popping in and out of shows. We found this band called Highasakite — one word — they’re from Norway. The lead singer, this girl has a huge voice — really cool.
Tommy: And then this morning we saw our friends in From Indian Lakes. They’re from California — awesome dudes.
Eric: Great band.
 
POZ: Is there anything else you’re planning on going to try to check out?
Tommy: I want to go try and see Little Dragon tomorrow.
Ian: I want to check out Royal Blood from the UK.
Jordan: The 1975 at noon on Saturday. We tried to get into Chromeo last night. That wasn’t happening.
Eric: Brick + Mortar is another cool band we’re gonna check out.
 
POZ: At the end of July, it’ll be a year since Twenty One Rooms was released and you’ve done quite a bit of touring in that time. Do you guys feel like you’ve exhausted those tracks at all playing them live?
Tommy: Never.
Eric: I mean, yes, sometimes they become monotonous, but we’re the kind of band and we’re the kind of people that like change and challenging ourselves. We never play the same set twice and any time we may have a song that is getting a little stale, we’ll just add something new to it or liven it up a little bit.
Ian: We just keep it interesting. I don’t think we’ve exhausted our songs — we’re stoked to play them live at every show — but I think now we’re excited to write new ones and throw ‘em into the set. At South By, we’re actually playing two new songs at every show, pretty much.
POZ: What are those called?
Ian: We don’t have official names.
Tommy: We’ve been using the fake name right now. I dunno if it’s going to stick or not.

POZ: With the new material, how has the reception been?
Tommy: Good, I think one of the new songs that we played yesterday probably got one of the better receptions, which is really nice to see. I think we’re heading for a progressive new direction.
Ian: The energy of the song I think really brings people in. It’s really… PAHH!
 
POZ: So you said that this is kind of a new direction for you guys?
Tommy: It’s a little, but we’re always evolving and changing. We’re never going to write the same thing. It’s a little bit different. I don’t think it’s anything far off. We’re not going to be playing a death metal song out of nowhere.
Eric: It still sounds like NGHBRS.

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POZ Stream: Picture Perfect - Rose

by Zack Zarrillo - Apr 14, 2014

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Picture Perfect will be releasing Rose via Mutant League Records tomorrow, and PropertyOfZack is happy to be debuting the album just a little early for fans. Pre-order Rose here and stream the full release below!

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POZ Review: Donovan Wolfington - Scary Stories You Tell In The Dark

by Zack Zarrillo - Apr 14, 2014

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by Zac Lomas, edited by Erik van Rheenen

Scary Stories You Tell in the Dark opens with an ominous sound bite proclaiming, “it is very likely that in one of these moments you are going to die.”  However, boring you to death is the last thing New Orleans punk outfit Donovan Wolfington plan on doing with their latest release.  The five tracks on Scary Stories You Tell in the Dark are nothing short of atmospheric, topping layer upon layer of fluffy goodness to create that irresistible audio cake you’ve been dying to kill your diet with.

Donovan Wolfington go all in on Scary Stories You Tell in the Dark, creating a listening experience that is completely indulgent, inciting listeners to lose themselves in the visceral, yet charming world of their music.  Album opener “Sleeping” laces soaring vocals, hanging chords, and ferociously fast-paced drums into a milieu of cathartic mystery, while “Alone” offers up a dreamy duet between Neil Berthier and Savannah Saxton.

The tongue-in-cheek “Keef Ripper” comes off, at first, as a true party anthem, but behind the cannabis inspired name is an infectiously repetitive jam that combines slight optimism with routine melancholy, as Berthier sings: “things aren’t great, but they’re okay… always.”  These simplistic, yet poignant lyrics paired with the fuzzy and dreamlike mess of guitars make for an endearing track with just enough kick to keep one hooked. 

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Ernie Ball