Modern Baseball, Petal Members Cover DCFC’s “The New Year”

by Zack Zarrillo - Jul 31, 2014

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Jake from Modern Baseball and Kiley from Petal recently covered Death Cab For Cutie's “The New Year” in a new Space Jam Session. Watch the video below after the jump. 

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Made In Seattle Featuring Ben Gibbard

by Zack Zarrillo - Jun 19, 2014

Ben Gibbard of Death Cab For Cutie was featured in Made In Seattle, Made In America and Noisey’s first collab. Watch the video below after the jump. 

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Fun Fun Fun Fest 2014 Lineup Announced

by Zack Zarrillo - May 19, 2014

The 2014 Fun Fun Fest will take place in Austin from November 7th through 9th. Check out the very diverse lineup below after the jump.

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Riot Fest Toronto Lineup Announced: Brand New, DCFC, TBS, NFG, National, Rise Against

by Zack Zarrillo - May 6, 2014

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Riot Fest 2014 is coming, and PropertyOfZack is so excited once again to be sponsoring the best festival you can buy a ticket for. First up for announcements is Toronto, and the lineup features Death Cab For Cutie, City And Colour, Brand New, Rise Against, The National, and more. Buy tickets here and check out the full lineup below after the jump!

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Ben Gibbard Releases “Shimmy Shimmy Ya” / “Let Me Clear My Throat” Mashup

by Zack Zarrillo - Apr 22, 2014

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Ben Gibbard has released a mashup of ODB’s “Shimmy Shimmy Ya” and DJ Kool’s “Let Me Clear My Throat.” Stream the song below after the jump.

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Death Cab For Cutie Record Store Day 2xLP Details

by Zack Zarrillo - Apr 9, 2014

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Death Cab For Cutie's Record Store Day release will be a 2xLP of live recordings from their 2012 tour with the Magik Magik Orchestra. Check out the track listing for the limited-to 3,500 copies release below after the jump.

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Outside Lands Festival 2014 Lineup Announced

by Zack Zarrillo - Apr 8, 2014

The 2014 Outside Lands Festival will be taking place from August 8th to August 10th. Check out the stacked lineup for the San Francisco-based festival below after the jump.

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Death Cab For Cutie Mini-May Tour

by Zack Zarrillo - Mar 11, 2014

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Death Cab For Cutie have a string of four shows set in May. Check out the dates below after the jump.

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Record Store Day: Paramore, Death Cab For Cutie, Green Day, Nirvana

by Zack Zarrillo - Feb 24, 2014

The list of Record Store Day 2014 releases is quickly growing. Information is coming out that Paramore, Death Cab For Cutie, Green Day, and Nirvana, among many more, are now set for releases. Check out listings from Wax Poetic below after the jump.

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Boston Calling: Brand New, Death Cab For Cutie, Built To Spill, Tegan And Sara, Frank Turner

by Zack Zarrillo - Jan 28, 2014

Boston Calling will be taking place from May 23rd to May 25th this year. The festival has officially announced its incredible lineup, and you can check out all the details below after the jump.

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Brand New, Death Cab For Cutie, Modest Mouse Playing Boston Calling

by Zack Zarrillo - Jan 27, 2014

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Boston Calling will be taking place from May 23rd to May 25th this year, and the lineup is star studded to say the least. Check out the lineup so far below after the jump.

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Ben Gibbard Scored New Film ‘Laggies’

by Zack Zarrillo - Jan 4, 2014

Ben Gibbard of Death Cab For Cutie scored a new film by Lynn Shelton called Laggies. Check out confirmation from Gibbard below after the jump.

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POZ BandsOnBands: Shy, Low On Death Cab For Cutie

by Zack Zarrillo - Dec 9, 2013

Monday means BandsOnBands, and we’re excited to be posting the new PropertyOfZack features today with each member of Shy, Low.

In this week’s feature, each member of the band talks about their love for Death Cab For Cutie. Listen to songs by Death Cab For Cutie here out what the band had to say about one of his biggest influences below!

ZAK BRYANT:
Death Cab For Cutie was always one of those bands that I just passed over. I never really took the time to listen to them, and I always figured that they weren’t worth a damn due to my preteen disinterest in anything popular (at the time, I only wanted to listen to System of a Down). The first song I heard was “Soul Meets Body” when I was thirteen, and I literally turned it off after fifteen seconds. A few years later, I was 

driving with my girlfriend, and she put on Death Cab. It was the “Sound of Settling,” and  I really dug the structure, harmonies, and overall atmosphere of that song. That’s what got me into Transatlanticism. Later on, I listened to Plans and fell in love with it. The song “What Sarah Said” really hit me when my grandmother started dying. I was there with her in the hospital during the last moments of her life, and, among other things, that song was stuck in my head.

IAN CURRIE:
Death Cab For Cutie was the first band that ever metaphorically spoke to me. Up until I purchased Plans, I just looked at lyrics as another layer of the song, never really paying attention to what was being said. Songs like “Summer Skin” really resonated with me. The bassist of that band is so good. The drummer and the bassist lock in together so well, and it sends their music to a whole other level. On the first of every year, I make sure that I listen to “The New Year” of Transatlanticism. I think Narrow Stairs is a cool record, but it sort of solidified my fleeting interest in Death Cab. “Cath” and “Talking Bird”are both great songs, and it kept my love for Ben Gibbard’s poetry alive. 

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POZ Discussion: Essential Fall Listening

by Zack Zarrillo - Nov 11, 2013

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Fall rules. From the pumpkins to the turkeys to the cider to the utter sadness that fills your heart when you listen to that certain song (whoa, that got dark quick). To celebrate PropertyOfZack’s favorite season, we’re launching a new Essential Fall Listening Discussion filled with TeamPOZ’s favorite albums for this season. Check out our guide, listen along, and feel free to reblog with your favorite fall records!

Brand New - Deja Entendu
While Brand New’s Deja Entendu may have arrived in the summer of 2003 it wouldn’t be for another two autumns that the album’s place as a “fall classic” in my eyes would take center stage. I had listened to the album numerous times in those two years and memorized it well but I never put purpose behind the words and how it meant to someone like me. Driving home after an exhausting day of selling retail (what any 17 year old does in high school) the car ride home was dreary and the rain was pouring. As “Okay I Believe You, but My Tommy Gun Don’t” began to play over the very wet October evening, I knew this was the time of year for such a moody and melancholy record when feelings felt mutual with the atmosphere. “Play Crack the Sky” even now is my go to for nights that slowly descend into very cold temperatures, something that considering current weather patterns, doesn’t always occur but it doesn’t matter. - Jason Stives

The Gaslight Anthem - The ‘59 Sound
While it’s perfectly reasonable to say that any Gaslight Anthem album is perfect for any season, there’s a particular feeling that will come over you when listening to The 59 Sound this fall. With so many of the songs dealing with the agony of lost love and the pain of looking back on better times, the album is perfect for anyone moving into a new phase of life, be it a new school, going to college, or facing the real world for the first time, The Gaslight Anthem’s sophomore full-length is the perfect companion through times of hardship or change, and when the leaves start changing and falling from the trees, that soaring chorus of “Great Expectations” takes on a whole new meaning. Sure, you probably just spent all summer listening to Handwritten up and down the highway this summer, but is there really ever a bad time to listen to The Gaslight Anthem? - Donald Wagenblast

Death Cab For Cutie - Plans
Despite including a song titled “Summer Skin,” Plans by Death Cab For Cutie is constantly in rotation during autumn for me. All Death Cab albums are, really, but Plans has a few standouts. It’s a strange time of year: on one hand, I love it, but there’s also this weird feeling of melancholy since it’s about to get cold and I do not enjoy the winter. 

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POZ Decade: Death Cab For Cutie - Transatlanticism

by Zack Zarrillo - Nov 5, 2013

Death Cab For Cutie’s fourth full-length Transatlanticism turned ten years old last month, and PropertyOfZack is launching our next Decade feature in honor of the stunning album today! We have commentary on the record from POZ team members Zac Lomas, Adrienne Fisher, and Erik van Rheenen, as well as Modern Baseball’s Jake Ewald, so enjoy reading and reblog to let us know your thoughts on Transatlanticism ten years later!

How Transatlanticism holds up in 2013
In my more formative years (think ages 16-18), I fell in love with indie icons Death Cab For Cutie while working as a camp counselor.  My co-counselor would play a mix of mellow songs each night in hopes that the soothing sounds would incite slumber, and while it may have worked on the wee ones, my sleep anxiety failed to surrender.  So what inevitably happened was that I listened to “Passenger Seat” off Death Cab’s Transatlanticism approximately 15-20 times per night…and I loved it.  From that point on, not only did I realize the genius of the Seattle quartet, but also the brilliance of that album. And while my days of obsessively listening to Death Cab albums have passed in the rear view mirror, I still find myself coming back to them with a smile on my face.  Transatlanticism is not only a complete album in every sense of the word, but it’s an indie masterpiece, and ten years later, its relevance and resonance are greater than ever. Transatlanticism is an album for lovers, dreamers, and the ever-hopeless romantic, regardless of the year. – Zac Lomas

Most important song on Transatlanticism
Transatlanticism was one of the first full albums I really got into as a wee lad, in the sense that I didn’t just buy the single on iTunes then play it on repeat out of my iPod mini while air-guitaring around my room. The whole thing blew me away every time. I swore off American Idiot for a year. Instead of barreling through power chord progressions on my horribly un-tunable Epiphone Jr., I found myself spending most nights plucking out the melody to “Title and Registration” and trying to figure a way to get to the mall the next day so I could buy one of those “capo” things. 

Death Cab leap-frogged way over their indie rock peers with the composition of “Title and Registration.” Somehow, fuzzed-out bass and cheap drum samples hold down one of the most emotive songs on the record. This peculiar instrumentation—for a mostly acoustic song—is what makes “Title and Registration” such a memorable indie ballad. The dudes didn’t play by the rules. And then the lyrics. Oh man, the lyrics. Ben Gibbard spends the whole first verse and chorus impeccably illustrating a heart-smashing feeling without even mentioning the damn thing he’s upset about! And of course, who could forget: “Now that it’s gone it’s like it wasn’t there at all / And here I rest where disappointment and regret collide.” Game over. “Title and Registration.” Take a lesson, kids.  – Jake Ewald


Did Death Cab succeed in following up Transatlanticism?
It’s kind of insane to realize that Transatlanticism, Death Cab’s breakout album, was already their fourth full-length, yet the fact that it took them some time to strike a shining medium between sparse indie rock and slick melodies couldn’t make more sense in the world. Plenty of fantastic records are often an accident; Transatlanticism certainly wasn’t, and neither was Plans, the 2005 follow-up. Released on major label Atlantic Records (after the band spent many years on the indie Barsuk), Plans saw pretty expansive success after it was released, from a Saturday Night Live appearance, to a Grammy nomination, to all sorts of treatment and visibility that plenty of indie bands could never even dream of seeing. But as I said, it was no accident – Plans is an excellent record that understandably branches away from the core style of Transatlanticism. 

The band messes more with synthesizers and writes more songs that tend to spiral away into nothingness instead of closing its fist around a chorus, which at points is devastating and fantastic (“What Sarah Said”) and other times disorienting and misplaced (“Different Names for the Same Thing”). But where Transatlanticism was lyrically rooted in setting and geography, Plans takes the next step and finds itself fixated in the bigger, universal themes of life, love, and death. “I Will Follow You Into the Dark” is the quietest declaration of Romeo-and-Juliet romance that this generation will ever see, while “Marching Bands of Manhattan” insists that “your love is gonna drown” shortly before “Soul Meets Body” lets you know that “if the silence takes you, then I hope it takes me too.” Horribly depressing, yes, but a beautiful and poetic take on the bleak ideas that have nowhere else to live but these solemn, dignified songs. – Adrienne Fisher

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