Big Stories

POZ Interview: We Butter The Bread With Butter

by Zack Zarrillo - Apr 17, 2014

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PropertyOfZack Senior Writer Jesse Richman sat down with We Butter The Bread With Butter at SXSW a month ago. We chatted with the band about SXSW, their recent US tour, their new album, pushing into the US, and more. Check out the full interview below!

POZ: Can I get your names and what you do in the band?
MN: My name is Marcel [Neumann], I am the guitar player and songwriter of the band We Butter The Bread With Butter.
PB: My name is Paul [Barztsch], and I am the singer.
 
POZ: So is this you guys’ first time at SXSW?
MN: Yeah, the first time. We’ve played our own show [in Austin previously], but this is the first time.
POZ: When did you get into town?
MN: Just today, in the morning. We walked around, tried to get a look at everything.
POZ: Did you get a chance to see any bands? Or will you while you’re here?
MN: Maybe after we load in. Right now we’re just walking around, seeing all the exotic stuff.
POZ: It’s kind of crazy here!
 
POZ: So you guys are just at the very tail end of a tour with Lions Lions and Honour Crest. How’s that been going?
MN: Very good. The beginning was quite hard because we hit all the blizzards on the eastern side [of the US]. We cancelled a show in, I think, Iowa, because our bus couldn’t move.
POZ: I live in New York, it’s been one hell of a winter.
MN: But since we’ve been on the west coast everything is awesome. The shows have been great.
 
POZ: How has the audience been? Have the fans reacted well? Just because I know you guys are kind of different from what Lions Lions and Honour Crest do.
MN: Yes. This is our goal, to be different from anyone else. But their audience was awesome. Seeing them try to sing our songs in German. I don’t know why but they really get into the language. It’s fun.
POZ: Do you find that you guys have a lot of fans of your own over here? Or is it more winning over the other bands’ fans at this point.
MN: I mean, this is our headliner tour.
POZ: Well, yeah. That’s fair.
MN: So most of the fans have been there for us.
POZ: I guess I just ask because you really haven’t toured the US much.
MN: This is our second tour [here]. It’s very interesting because the audience is very different from Germany, but it’s great to see people come out so far away from our home. They knew our music for six or seven years. This is very amazing. Awesome.
 
POZ: Ok, so the album [Goldkinder] came out last August I believe? Was that a worldwide release? I know you did it independently.
MN: It was a worldwide release, with some day’s difference — the 9th in Germany, the 10th in…
POZ: So, pretty close. So it’s been out for a while, are you happy with how it’s been received at this point?
MN: Oh yeah, because we knew that this record was going in another direction than we did before, and we knew that a lot of people wouldn’t like it. But we also tried to reach out to a very different kind of audience, and somehow, it started working. The audience is different. They’re more into music, and not just into seeing another scene metalcore band. It’s more about being real fans of one band’s music. It was a very risky step, but it was worth it.
PB: The crowd changed really hard. The first time we played here, we had a lot of “mosh kids” and hardcore kids. This time, [the crowds are] full of party people. They want to party with us. It’s really cool.
MN: Full of “rock and roll people”.
 
POZ: Was that something you were conscious of when you were writing the album, that you wanted to take that turn? Or is it just how it came out.
MN: It was totally… Like, we didn’t want to do something that does not express ourselves. Just doing the same stuff we did on the last two records wouldn’t satisfy us as musicians, so we just did what we really wanted to do. Yeah! That was kind of the writing process, yeah.
PB: This music is 100% us.
MN: I think it’s more We Butter than ever before. It’s really what we love to do, and we don’t care what others think about it.

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POZ Interview: Blacklist Royals

by Zack Zarrillo - Apr 16, 2014

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PropertyOfZack Senior Writer Jesse Richman sat down with Blacklist Royals at SXSW a month ago. We chatted with the band about SXSW, Die Young With Me, changing musical directions, heavier content, touring, and more. Check out the interview below!

POZ: First of all, can I get your names and what you do in the band?
NR: I’m Nat [Rufus], I sing and play guitar.
RR: I’m Rob [Rufus], I play drums.
 
POZ: You guys just got off the stage at the Blind Pig [at Big Picture Media’s SXSW showcase]. How did the set go?
RR: I thought it was alright, man. South By is kind of a different animal as far as playing shows goes, because it’s like…
NR: It’s just like get up, play for ten minutes, get off. You know what I mean? We’re playing a bunch of shows and stuff. But I thought it was cool. It was by far the best show we’ve played down here.
RR: Yeah, it was fun.
NR: And knowing what our schedule is tomorrow, it’s going to be the best. [Laughs]
POZ: What’s it look like? How many are you doing tomorrow?
NR: We’re just doing one, but we have to be there at 9am.
POZ: Is that like, a radio thing?
RR: With Lisa Marie Presley!
POZ: Ohhhhh-kay… How did that happen?
NR: I don’t know how anything happens these days, dude, I mean, to be honest.
RR: I mean, don’t you see the natural pairing of us and Lisa Marie Presley?
POZ: Honestly, I saw Lisa Marie on the SXSW schedule and I was really tempted to go see it just because.
NR: Oh bro, I gotta get a picture with her ass.
POZ: I don’t know what she’s doing here, but I kind of want to see.
NR: I guess she’s singing? Maybe?
RR: And we’re the opening act!
POZ: Get some Whole Foods breakfast, it’ll be great.
RR: That’s what I’m hoping! They have an open bar, can we get, like, an open salad bar in this motherfucker? Because we’re leaving right afterwards. Whatever. It should be good. I thought this afternoon was really fun. The showcase was great. All of the other bands were really good.
 
POZ: When did you guys get down here?
NR: We got down here like three days ago.
RR: Tuesday?
NR: Tuesday, yeah.
POZ: How many shows have you played so far.
NR: We’ve done shows every day we’ve been here. I think this was our third show, tomorrow’s four. Which isn’t a lot compared to what a lot of bands do. I know there are some bands down here playing, like, twelve fucking shows. But yeah, it was cool.
POZ: Have you had a chance to see any other bands?
RR: I’ve seen a couple, man. The days have usually been like, we play and then everybody kind of splits off. I’ve seen Dum Dum Girls a couple times. I saw Johnny Two Bags, he’s the guitarist for Social D[istortion], it’s his solo thing, it was awesome.
POZ: I didn’t even know he was here.
NR: It was great! It was actually all of Social D, and then their guitar tech — minus Mike Ness.
RR: But it was awesome, yeah.
NR: And I got to catch X the other day, they were awesome.
RR: Together Pangea was awesome.
POZ: I got to see X at Riot Fest this summer, they were so good.
NR: Oh bro! Fuckin’ John Doe up there, he is cool as hell! Dude, you missed out man. I mean, it was great. But yeah, we’ve all… Diamond Youth, we saw.
POZ: I saw them too.
NR: We’ve kinda been doing our thing. And then Two Cow Garage, I might catch them later. There’s a couple bands I want to see this afternoon.
 
POZ: You guys have done the SXSW thing before this year, right?
RR: Yeah, yeah.
POZ: So you knew what you were getting into.
RR: Yeah we did. It’s the first year we’ve had the wristbands. After that fucking horrible shit happened the other day [the drunk driving accident], we were kind of bummed, but then we were like, lets try and enjoy our lives and listen to fuckin’ music.
POZ: I was two blocks away seeing Against Me! when it all went down.
RR: Yeah I was at the Against Me! show.
POZ: Oh you were there? I was having a blast through the first part of the show, until all the text messages started coming in.
NR: I was at Mohawk [the venue in front of which the accident occurred], I reached this point where I said “holy shit, I’m too drunk, I need to leave and get food” and I did. And then right after, I saw that stuff. It really kind of put us all in a fucked up headspace the other day. I dunno, the whole thing was really pretty heavy to take in. But like you said, there’s nothing we can do now except try to live our lives.

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POZ Interview: No Somos Marineros

by Zack Zarrillo - Apr 15, 2014

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PropertyOfZack Senior Writer Jesse Richman sat down with No Somos Marineros at SXSW a month ago. We chatted with the band about SXSW, new recordings, their relationship with Topshelf, growing as a band, and more. Check out the interview below!

POZ: Just to start, can I get your names and what you do in the band?
CGS: I’m Carlos [González Soto], I play guitar and [I sing].
AP: I’m Andrés [Pérez], and I play drums.
OR: I’m Oscar [Rubio], and I play guitar.
GF: Gustavo [Farfán], bass.
 
POZ: So let me start this off by saying, I actually saw you guys last year at SXSW, at the Pearl St. Co-op, when you played over there. And I was really blown away — I thought you were fantastic. I went online to find more info and the one thing I discovered is that — probably because you’re Mexican — everything out there is in Spanish, and there is very little in English about you guys. So to start out I just want to ask the basics. How did you get together? Where are you from? How did you start playing your music?
CGS: We’re based in Mexico City, mostly. Andres and Oscar are friends that go way back; they’ve played together from a long time ago.
AP: Since we were like twelve or thirteen.
CGS: We met through some of our friends. Gustavo had another band. Julio [Muñoz], who’s not here, had another band also. So we all kind of knew each other through music and through other friends. We all got together and started playing.
POZ: How did you guys get into hardcore and emo and that kind of music?
AP: It’s the kind of music we’ve listened to since we were teenagers.
POZ: I guess I don’t even know, is there a big scene in Mexico City? Or in Mexico, generally?
CGS: Like ten, twelve years ago, there was this sprouting of emo in the city.
GF: Actually, that’s the band I played in ten years ago, and that’s where I met Carlos and Andres.
POZ: What was it called?
GF: Mayer.
CGS: Like Oscar Mayer. Like John Mayer [laughs].
GF: That was, like, the result of listening to Glassjaw and Thursday and all that stuff at that time. We liked 90s emo. I think this is just the result of listening to the same music.
CGS: There’s this band that’s kind of big in Mexico called Austin TV. And they kind of led the way in that sort of genre. But we all like their influences — not really Austin TV. Like Joan Of Arc, Cap’n Jazz, Owen…
POZ: So basically every band a Kinsella has been in [laughs].
AP: Fugazi…
CGS: We all come from sort of the same school. We all listened to pop punk, and then punk, and then hardcore and emo. Forwards and backwards. That’s how we got to this place.
 
POZ: So how long ago did you get together as No Somos Marineros?
CGS: 2010, we got together as No Somos Marineros. We became friends through another project, and through other friends, Light & Noise [a collective of photographers, musicians and designers; find out more at www.lightandnoise.tv], we’re all together in that. And we wanted to also make a band, so we started.
POZ: What have you released so far — I’m not sure how far back the music you’ve put out goes, I just know the newest stuff you have online.
CGS: A year and a half ago, we released a three song demo [Demo juvenil en vivo]…
POZ: Oh, was that the first thing you guys had released?
CGS: Yeah.
POZ: Ok, I wasn’t sure if there was more out there I didn’t know about.
CGS: No, nothing. Just home recordings of awful stuff, hours and hours of awful stuff [laughs]. And then we released the three song demo. And then we released a single [“Violencia River”] that got played on the radio and stuff. And we recently released a split EP with a Venezuelan band called The ZETA. Like the letter “z”. They played two songs, we played two songs, it was a live recording all the way. That’s our last thing.
 
POZ: Do you have plans for more recording coming up?
CGS: We do.
OR: Yeah, we plan to, after we finished SXSW… “South By”… we’ve been filming all along our trip. We’re planning a short video of tonight, and then record a song. That’ll be the next song.
CGS: We’re planning to release this song as a single, and then start to pre-produce what we want to hopefully become a full length.
POZ: Are you guys doing that on your own? Is there a label involved?
CGS: Kind of on our own. Light & Noise Records is starting, but that’s also us.
POZ: So your label is you!
OR: Exactly! [Laughs].
CGS: We’ve been approached by some other people back in Mexico who wanted to work with us, but it didn’t really work. So we’re just planning to keep it on our own.

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POZ Interview: Analog Rebellion

by Zack Zarrillo - Apr 14, 2014

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PropertyOfZack Senior Writer Jesse Richman sat down with Analog Rebellion at SXSW a month ago. We chatted with the band about SXSW, their new album Ill’e Grande, recording some of it in Berlin, and more. Check out the interview below!

by Jesse Richman

POZ: First of all, can I get your names and what you do in the band?
DH: Daniel Hunter, I sing and I do stuff.
CH: Cory Harvard, I play drums.
[We were also joined by musician / executive producer / Dabbo Records owner Taylor Pile].
 
POZ: To start out, when did you get down here to SXSW?
DH: Last night at 4am, 5am.
POZ: Where were you coming from?
DH: We played a show in Dallas last night.
POZ: That’s home for you guys, right?
DH: Yeah. We wanted to drive in the middle of the night when there wasn’t any traffic.
POZ: Are you sticking around for South By, or are you just in and out?
DH: We had a show earlier today [Friday 3/14] and we have a show tomorrow, and then we’ll maybe stick around Sunday and leave Monday. Depends on who’s playing.
POZ: I imagine you’ve done the whole deal here before.
DH: Yeah, yeah. I try to avoid Austin during SXSW unless I’m here for business, I guess.
POZ: Are you planning on trying to check anyone out while you’re here?
DH: I don’t have any plans to, not really.
CH: Yeah, we haven’t seen a list of who’s playing in the next couple days.
TP: We’ve been so busy, but our good friends at The Syndicate [a marketing agency] have given us VIP to the Hype Hotel, so we’re planning on just hanging out there.
POZ: Doesn’t even matter who’s playing, it’ll be a good time.
TP: Yeah, I mean, free tacos, free booze, free fun.
CH: He knows way more about what’s going on than we do.
DH: Yeah we’re along for the ride [laughs].
TP: That’s kind of my thing.
 
POZ: So let’s talk about the new album, Ill’e Grande, it came out last month. First of all… how is it pronounced?
DH: I pronounce it “ill grahn-day”. Essentially, if you just have capital “i”, lowercase “l”, lowercase “l”, it just looks like three in Roman Numerals or something, so we just…stylized it I guess.
POZ: Is there a story behind that name?
DH: Well the reason it starts with “i” is because I name my albums alphabetically, chronologically. So my my first album is Ancient ElectronsBesides, NothingCavanaugh, Something. I’m on “i” now, so it had to start with “i”. It’s kind of a hard one! [Laughs]
POZ: Does the name have a particular meaning?
DH: I was going to write an album about a misunderstood school bully named Ill’e Grande, but we really only did one song about it. [Laughs].
POZ: But the name stuck.
DH: Yeah.
CH: It was the driving force behind the record.
 
POZ: You recorded this thing in Berlin, is that right?
DH: Some in Berlin, some of it in Brooklyn, some of it in Dallas.
POZ: How did Berlin happen? Why Berlin?
TP: I originally went there with my girlfriend. I own a record label, it’s called Dabbo Records. I met some good friends in Berlin and they took me to this abandoned NSA listening station. We got to the very top of it, and the dome at the top was this very big dome where a satellite used to be, but it was all gutted, from when the Wall fell. And I clapped, and the delay was like ten seconds. I was like “I have to make music here,” and the first person I thought of was Daniel, because Daniel has such an amazing voice. I was like “I’ve got to get Daniel here!” Two months later, we were there making music, and we started our relationship as musicians and friends.
DH: Buddies.
TP: After that, we went to Brooklyn and really got down drums and everything. It’s impossible to record everything in an abandoned NSA listening station, let’s be real.
POZ: Was it tough lugging gear up there and stuff?
DH: I mean, we didn’t bring that much gear.
CH: It was kind of a minimal setup.
DH: But even the gear we did bring was a pain in the ass. We brought everything except for water.
CH: [Laughs] yeah, we were really thirsty!
DH: Right before we did that one take, my mouth was like… sand.
TP: But at the tower, they have security there, and we didn’t let them know what we were doing, so a couple of times they came up to check on us and we had to tear everything down. We had kind of a lookout. So within five minutes, we had to get all our gear torn down.
POZ: How long were you guys up there? Just for a day?
DH: Maybe four or five hours?
TP: Four or five hours. We actually had a person at the top and a person at the bottom with a walkie-talkie. So if the security guards were about to come up, we had to tear down all our stuff and make it look like we were checking out the place, and then once they went back down we had to rebuild it. It was actually quite frustrating.
POZ: Yeah, that sounds like a pain. I know you’re very experienced with the home recording thing, so I imagine you at least have a rig that’s easy to set up and go real quick, and you know what you’re doing.
DH: It was a simple rig, but even a simple rig is complicated in a place like that.

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POZ Discussion: Deserted Island Albums

by Zack Zarrillo - Apr 9, 2014

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It’s somewhere between Lost and Pirates Of The Caribbean and you’ve found yourself trapped on a deserted island in the middle of an ocean. The good news is that for some reason you found out your iPod will never die, but only if you remove every album you have on it except for three very special ones. What would your Deserted Island Albums be? That’s the theme of a new PropertyOfZack Discussion that includes each POZ team member picking three of their own deserted island albums with a description to go along with one of them. Reblog to let us know what yours are, and check out our Discussion below!

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blink-182 - Untitled, by Zack Zarrillo
Crafting my Deserted Island Albums list was supposed to be simple, but then I thought about it a little more. Do I just pick my top three favorite albums of all time? Hm, no. blink-182’s Untitled is an obvious choice because it is my “everything” album, but The Devil And God Are Raging Inside Me (my number two) probably wouldn’t be something I would want to listen to all day if I was stuck alone. Forever. Regardless, Untitled was always going to be there. It’s the perfect blink-182 album for the same reason it’s a perfect (for me) Desert Island album. There’s the uplifting energetic “Feeling This” and “Go,” mixed with the lovestruck “I Miss You” and “Down,” paired with the introspective “Asthenia” and “Not Now (I’ll be taking the UK version, please) and the hopeless “I’m Lost Without You.”

I could write a whole bunch of words on the album, but I already did that last year when Untitled turned ten.

Regardless, the record is what I’d want to hold ever-so-tightly to my chest on a lonely island because it hits on almost every emotion I could ask for. And with a limited choice in music for potentially forever, that’s a pretty good fit.

I’m also bringing…
Jack’s Mannequin - Everything In Transit
Mansions - Dig Up The Dead

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Something Corporate - Leaving Through The Window, Adrienne Fisher
When I was 16, I wrote a Xanga entry that simply said “Midtown is my favorite band, but if I had to listen to one album for the rest of my life, it’d be Leaving Through The Window. Since basically nothing’s changed in 10 years, in either the music scene or my emotional development, I’m sticking to my statement. While I can’t say that “Punk Rock Princess” would be the best soundtrack to myself Tom Hanksing my survival and isolation on this deserted island, the record’s got plenty to say on dreaming of escape and/or rescue - come on, the opening song’s even called “I Want to Save You.”

On a serious note, this album’s stood the test of time better than most records that’ve won my stamp of Favorite Ever, and I’d imagine that if I was struggling to keep sane while coping with my new island life, I’d want a comforting record on in the background that I know will never get old and has the ability to be somewhat uplifting. You know, something to keep me going when I’m tracing Emoji patterns in the night sky to pass the time or outlining my Twitter handle in rocks on the beach to let passing planes know just who exactly needs saving.

I’m also bringing…
Fall Out Boy - Take This To Your Grave
Saves the Day - Through Being Cool

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Yellowcard - Ocean Avenue, by Becky Kovach
It’s probably no big surprise that Ocean Avenue is my number one Deserted Island Album. Beyond just being my favorite album by my favorite band, it’s the album that made me fall in love with music and the album that made me want to get involved in the industry in the first place. Ocean Avenue is the album I go back to every time I start to doubt where I am or what I’m doing. And I could listen to it on repeat for pretty much forever, because it stands just as strong now as it did the first time I ever heard it. Plus, Ocean Avenue is the perfect summer album. What could be better for a deserted island?

I’m also bringing…
Bayside - The Walking Wounded  
Fall Out Boy - From Under The Cork Tree

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Bayside – Self-Titled, by Brandon Allin
In all reality, despite any kind of optimism, being stranded on a deserted island, alone, devoid of any kind of food, water, and supplies, would hardly be a vacation. One thing that might make the situation a little more bearable would be music, a few of your favorite records to help the hours pass by, and maybe even keep you sane.

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POZ Interview: PUP

by Zack Zarrillo - Apr 9, 2014

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PropertyOfZack Senior Writer Jesse Richman sat down with Zack Mykula of PUP at SXSW a few weeks ago. We chatted with the band about SXSW, their debut album out now via SideOneDummy Records, touring, and more. Check out the interview below!

by Jesse Richman

POZ: Can I get your name and what you do in the band?
ZM: My name’s Zack [Mykula], I play drums.
 
POZ: So when did you guys get down here to SXSW?
ZM: We got here on Wedn… no, Tuesday, actually.
POZ: Ok, so you’ve been here for a couple days already.
ZM: It’s been insane. We had booked this hotel room four months ago, and they decided to give our rooms away.
POZ: Are you kidding?
ZM: So we get there, and the [hotel clerk] flipped out really. Our lead singer [Stefan Babcock] was like “you gave away our room?” and [the clerk] was like “you’re giving me attitude?” Like, who wouldn’t give attitude! It’s like, we booked it four months ago. Usually you charge when the person gets there. You had it declined, and didn’t wait for us so you gave away the room. So of course we’re going to be upset. And the he insinuated that he had a gun and…
POZ: What?!
ZM: Like… It wasn’t like he was threatening us. But he’s like, “my shirt’s out.” Because it came up that we needed security because all this riff-raff had come in, because it’s South By. And I’m like “oh, you need security.” And he’s like “no, I’m well trained. I was in the Israeli military.” And I’m like “so do you know krav maga?” You know, that martial arts stuff. And he’s like “yeah, and also, my shirt’s out. Do you know the significance of that?” And I’m like, “no. What.” And he’s like “well I could be holding a gun and you wouldn’t know.” And I’m pretty sure that’s illegal, it’s a concealed weapon.
POZ: Maybe not in Texas.
ZM: No I think you need a license for a concealed weapon. So, yeah, that happened. We’re like “ok, fine, we’ll take a smoking room.” We go up there and we’re “ok, well, this wasn’t what we agreed to so there’s no way you can charge us full price.” And he’s like, “I told you I wouldn’t negotiate. You’re really pissing me off, and if you don’t leave right now, I’m going to call the cops!” So that was the end of our hotel.
POZ: What have you been doing?
ZM: We slept in the van that night. Luckily enough, we have some friends in town, and we stayed at other hotels, so it’s worked out. But that was an adventurous start. And otherwise… drinking!
 
POZ: Have you guys played yet since you’ve been here?
ZM: No, tonight [Thursday March 13th at the VICE Records Showcase] is the first one. I think it’s going to be great. It’s the first time we’ve ever played at South By, so that’s pretty exciting. We’re playing with OFF! and the Black Lips basically, so that’s insane.
POZ: That’s pretty cool!
ZM: Oh yeah, it’s amazing.
POZ: Are you a little intimidated, getting up there to warm up [OFF! frontman / punk legend] Keith Morris?
ZM: Oh yeah! Like, there’s peers in the audience… Not only are we playing with Black Lips and OFF!, our peers are in the audience. Our manager — we always want to make sure he’s happy with us, obviously. And there’s new people, a new audience. So it’s kind of nerve wracking. But also, usually when we get on stage that goes away. So it should be fine.
 
POZ: Have you had a chance to see anything yet?
ZM: Yeah! Diarrhea Planet is my #1 pick. I saw them last night. They’ve been a favorite for a while, but I saw them for the first time last night, and then I happened upon them today at Frank’s at like, 1:00, and I was insanely hung over, but as soon as I saw them it was gone. Which could also be attributed to the beer I had.
POZ: [laughs] Let’s give Diarrhea Planet the credit!
ZM: Yeah, they’re amazing.

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POZ Interview: Bob Nanna, Mark Rose

by Zack Zarrillo - Apr 8, 2014

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PropertyOfZack Senior Writer Jesse Richman sat down with Bob Nanna (Braid) and Mark Rose (Spitalfield) at SXSW a few weeks ago. We chatted with Bob and Mark about their SXSW experiences, growing Downwrite, podcasting, future music, and a ton more. Check out the interview below!

by Jesse Richman

POZ: So how are you guys doing?
Both: Doin’ great!
 
POZ: So let’s start with Bob. You just got offstage at the BrooklynVegan day party [at SXSW]. How do you feel like your set went?
BN: I feel like it went really well. It’s always weird, you know, when it’s just one person. In this case, I had Lauren, my fiancee, come up and sing a few songs with me. Either way, it’s quiet, it’s a fest, there’s music everywhere, but I think it went well. There were enough people up front where everyone could hear if they wanted to hear.
 
POZ: Cool. You have been playing quite the South By schedule this year. You’ve been doing a lot of shows! What was the decision behind that?
BN: There really is no decision. When we decided to come to SXSW — and this is the same as when Braid came, I actually played some solo shows and with Lauren as well (as Jack And Ace) — you just try and play as much as possible. Because that’s what you’re here for, to play music in front of people. At least for folks like Mark and myself. So when we decided to come down I just started getting on the phone with people, I was like “can I play your showcase? Can I get on your show?” So I played the Topshelf one and the Count Your Lucky Stars one and the BrooklynVegan one. I try and play as much as possible. And then we did our own showcase as well.
 
POZ: One thing I was going to say is, you had a decent crowd in there at the BrooklynVegan showcase but it was definitely smaller than the crowd up at the Topshelf showcase I was at. That was the one you didn’t end up getting to play at [the show was shut down by police before his set]. I guess I’m just wondering, you know, “emo revival” is all the talk right now, and yet for all the talk that Pitchfork and these other sites are covering it, and how it’s now “cool” again, it seems like maybe there’s still a divide here.
BN: Well, a little bit, but it’s not… there aren’t even playing fields. The line to get in here is stupid. I had friends texting me beforehand like “can you get me in” and no, I tried, but it’s at capacity, they won’t let anybody in. I actually had to sneak someone in the side. So the playing fields aren’t level. Tonight, at Count Your Lucky Stars, it will be like anyone who wants to come should be able to get in. But here, if you’re not waiting in line to see the Hold Steady or something, or if you just want to catch my set and leave, it’s impossible.
 
POZ: So one of the sets you played while you were down here was the Downwrite showcase that you and Mark put together. Why don’t you tell me a little bit about the decision to put that together and to bring it down to South By?
MR: It was fairly last-minute. We knew that we wanted to be down here — we were going to come down no matter what, just to meet up with friends and guys in bands and songwriters that we know, talk to management, PR people, about Downwrite. But kind of last minute, a buddy from Chicago who’s in on the [Blind Pig] Rooftop on 6th let us know that they had a slot available. So we talked to Josh Berwanger from The Anniversary, who’s on the site, and Steve Soboslai from Punchline, and we were like, “you know what, lets do a two hour block, the four of us will play, and we’ll have something official to at least advertise.” It was cool, it was fun. It was early afternoon Thursday, beautiful weather, open rooftop show, and it felt good because while we’re up there playing — I played, Bob played, Steve and Josh — it really wasn’t competing with a lot of the noise on 6th St. I feel like a couple hours later and it would have been impossible to hear us. It was cool. I’m happy to be down here repping what we’re doing in general, but the showcase in particular was cool because people were coming in specifically to hear what we’re talking about and what we’re trying to do.
BN: And for the free beer!
MR: That’s a big bonus.

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POZ Interview: Gameface

by Zack Zarrillo - Apr 7, 2014

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PropertyOfZack Senior Writer Jesse Richman sat down with Jeff Caudill of Gameface at SXSW a few weeks ago. We chatted with the band about SXSW, reuniting, the release of Now Is What Matters Now, potential touring, and much more. Check out the interview below!

by Jesse Richman

POZ: Can I get your name and what you do in the band?
JC: Jeff Caudill. I play guitar and sing.
 
POZ: So you guys just rolled into South By?
JC: We came in last night, and just hung out and tried to stay safe.
POZ: Had you been down here before?
JC: Back in the old days, we played a very un-un-un-unofficial thing. We tried to always have our tours correspond to this, just because it’s a fun place to be. But we were never a South By band. In recent years, I’ve come just to hang, and play a little acoustic thing here and there.
POZ: How has it changed from back in the day? Is it even recognizable?
JC: It gets bigger and bigger and bigger every year. It’s crazy. It’s absolutely crazy now.
 
POZ: So like you said, you guys played unofficial back in the day but then weren’t here for a long time. That’s because there wasn’t a band for a long time! You’re now back together. How does it feel? Has it settled in that you’re really doing this again?
JC: Maybe after this week it will. Our record [Now Is What Matters Now] comes out on Tuesday [March 18th]. It has been; it’s been very surreal. We got together in 2012 for some reunion shows — just a few — and that went really well. We didn’t mean to start the band again. Basically, we wanted better closure. Our break-up was messy; we basically imploded in 2003. It had been icy since then. It took ten years for us to be friends again. And then when the opportunity to do the Revelation Records anniversary shows, we said if we’re going to do it, we should do it now. Let’s just see how it works. We got back together just to rehearse for those shows. It was awesome. It feels different now because all of the expectations, and just all of the stuff you deal with when you’re really trying to do a band, it kind of means something different now because we don’t really care about all of that stuff. Anyway, I’m getting ahead of myself. When we got back together to do the shows, we had no intention of doing new material. We just wanted to see if we could be friends, see if we could have fun, and revisit those old songs. I even said “we’re not writing new material, this is not a thing.” But it just felt good, it felt good enough. And then I started writing a lot. Like a lot, like all last year I wrote. It got to be really, really exciting.
 
POZ: So is the new album all stuff that was written in the last year? Were there songs that were leftover from the old days?
JC: It’s all brand new. It’s all from 2013, pretty much. We were pretty good about editing ourselves, and not having too much run over, even in the old days, so there weren’t any old Gameface songs lying around. And even if there were, I don’t think we would have touched that anyway?
 
POZ: Was it tough to start writing for Gameface again? Or does it come back to you like riding a bike?
JC: Oh man, honestly it just happened. And the thing is, I do other projects and play with other bands and write music all the time. I didn’t even have to write specifically for this band. This is just how we sound when these four people play music together. A lot of people have asked, “did you consciously try to update your sound? Did you try to sound like you did back in the old days?” And we didn’t really try anything at all. This is just how it works. And I think, it doesn’t sound dated, but it doesn’t really sound like be tried to be all 2014 either.
POZ: Did you have to keep stuff out that didn’t fit you guys?
JC: No, not at all, it was completely natural. This is just what this band does. I’m sure that, to some people, we might sound like belong in the 90s. But whatever, that’s just who we are.
POZ: Well I’m not sure you guys fit into the 90s, in the 90s!
JC: Nope! That’s a whole other conversation.
 
POZ: Well let’s have that conversation! You guys kind of were odd ducks in the 90s. No one really sounded like you, and I think maybe there wasn’t a natural fit in terms of a scene. Do you feel like that’s changed now? Do you still feel like you’re way out there?
JC: Now? I have no idea. I really don’t. And the beauty of it is, that’s not important to me anymore. It used to bother me. It used to bother me that we didn’t have a scene. We didn’t fit in with the emo thing but we were embraced by part of it. We also didn’t really fit the pop-punk thing, but we were embraced by part of that. We’re not a Warped Tour bad, and we’re not a Jade Tree band — that was kind of how we felt. But now, it’s great. We’re fuckin’ 40 years old and we don’t give a shit. We’re just playing what we love to play. And thank god for Equal Vision, and for people who still care about our band. That’s the only reason we’re doing this.

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POZ Interview: Mime Game

by Zack Zarrillo - Apr 5, 2014

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PropertyOfZack Senior Writer Jesse Richman sat down with Mime Game at SXSW a few weeks ago. We chatted with the band about SXSW, their last EP, working towards a full length and more music, studio time, and more. Check out the interview below!

by Jesse Richman

POZ: If you guys can start off just by going around and saying what your name is and what you do in the band?
DD: I’m Dillon [DeVoe], I write the songs, I play guitar and I sing.
DB: Duncan Burnett, I play the drums.
DG: Dalton Gomez, I play lead guitar.
JB: Joey [Brunk], I play bass guitar.
 
POZ: So when did you guys get down to South By?
DD: We just got in about an hour and a half ago. We played a show in Kansas City last night, so we drove ten and a half hours through the night.
POZ: Wow, you must be tired!
DB: From twelve to eleven!
DD: Yeah, a little bit. A little bit tired.
 
POZ: When are you playing down here?
DD: We’ve got two showcases tomorrow [March 14th], and then we’re playing a private party at Kerry O’Quinn’s house — he’s the guy who started Fangoria.
POZ: Oh wow, that’s cool! How did that come together?
DD: We met him last year at South By, he was just handing out flyers, walking around on 6th, for a party at his house. Just an unassuming dude who was doing his thing. We were like “let’s go to this party, seems like it will be cool.” And then we get there, and he’s got pictures of himself with J. J. Abrams on the wall. We’re like “who are you?” and he’s like “oh, I’m the guy who started Fangoria. Me and Robert Rodriguez are about to make a movie.” And we’re like “whaaaat? Cool!”
POZ: Now you just gotta get on that soundtrack!
DD: Yeah, that’s what I’ve been saying! We just need to make some dark, dirty, bluesy stuff for him.
DG: It’s gonna be called Dragworms.
DD: I don’t know if we can talk about it, but this movie’s gonna be really cool. He’s going to kill every famous horror person that you love — cameos from every amazing actor that you could ever think of. It’s going to be his first major motion picture as well, I think. It’s going to be cool.
 
POZ: So you’ve done the South By thing before, you know the craziness that’s here. Are there any bands you’re trying to get to see while you’re here?
DD: I’m trying to see The 1975 if I can.
POZ: Let me just say, I had all these people telling me last year at SXSW, “you need to see the 1975”. I didn’t do it — I hadn’t heard the stuff, I just didn’t have time to squeeze it in. I have been kicking myself ever since. That record is fucking amazing, I love that band.
DD: I’ve burned a hole through it in my CD player.
DB: We went on tour last October, and that was like the official soundtrack for tour. We pretty much went through the album, back and forth, twenty or thirty times.
 
POZ: What other kinds of stuff do you guys listen to?
DD: Everything!
DB: Don’t say everything, it’s not everything.
DD: I’m really excited for the new Manchester Orchestra record Cope. The singles and the video they’ve been releasing — everything about it has got me so excited, especially in the press where they’ve been saying they want to get back to as close to their live sound as they could. That’s why they picked a one word title for the name, just to cut the fat and make it as energetic as they are live. I’m really excited to see what that sounds like in full.
 
POZ: So let’s talk a little bit about you guys. You just put an EP out [Do Your Work]. Now tell me a little about… Actually, tell me a little about how you came together first, I feel like people don’t really know you.
DD: I was in a band called Josephine Collective, we made a record with John Feldmann [We Are The Air], did the whole… Was in that world. And I started writing stuff that was a little more rock-y, folk-y, and it wasn’t really fitting for the band. So I decided to make another project — like a side project — to facilitate that sound that I was working on. And when that band broke up, I turned it into my main focus. Over the past five or so years, I’ve gone through a lot of different lineups, and worked with a lot of different people. Finally, three years, I started working with Dalton. [I moved to] Atlanta and started working with a few guys there, one of which is now the drummer for The Dangerous Summer. Our guitarist and producer did the Major League record, Corey Gable, he’s a really cool guy. We’ve kinda been scratching at the surface for a while but didn’t have that gelled unit. And then we moved back to Kansas City from Atlanta and met Duncan, and started playing with him. And Joey’s been playing with us for three days! It’s been a crazy ride. It started as just a project for me, and it’s become, because of that, a lot closer to my heart, and a lot more honest and indicative of what I’m trying to create in the world.
DB: We’re actually a band now.
DD: It feels like a unit.
POZ: So it’s gone from feeling like a solo project to a band.
DD: I couldn’t do it without these guys. So it’s definitely not a solo project any more.

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POZ Interview: Foxing

by Zack Zarrillo - Apr 2, 2014

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PropertyOfZack Senior Writer Jesse Richman sat down with Josh Coll of Foxing SXSW a few weeks ago. We chatted with the band about SXSW, an upcoming tour with Seahaven, releasing new music, reworking arrangements, and much more. Check out the full interview below!

Related Stories:
Seahaven, Foxing, Adventures Announce Spring Tour

by Jesse Richman

To start, can I get your name and what you do in the band?
JC: My name is Josh Coll, I play bass in Foxing.
 
Ok, so you guys just played a set at the Run For Cover showcase here at SXSW. How did the set go?
JC: I enjoyed it. I think that we played it well. It seemed like the crowd was into it. We cut a song, which is always a little bit of a bummer, but we didn’t want… With these showcases, obviously they prepare for the fact that they’re going to run over, but you don’t want to be the band that causes the snowball effect, where everybody’s set is now an hour behind where it should be. So yeah, I thought overall it was a lot of fun.
POZ: Was this your first set down at South By?
JC: No, we played one last night. I guess there’s two labels down here, one’s called Texas Is Funny  and the other one is Better Days Will Haunt You, and we played their showcase yesterday.
POZ: So you guys have been down here for a day already. Did you get a chance to see any bands, hang around, any of that kind of stuff?
JC: Yeah, we saw our friends in football, etc. play at that show yesterday. And we saw Cloakroom last night, that was pretty great. That’s pretty much all that I’ve actually seen so far.
POZ: How much longer are you guys in town?
JC: We’re here ‘til Saturday.
POZ: Oh, so you’re really doing it!
JC: Yeah! We’re doing it, man! We tried to set it up as one of those things where… We’ve heard so many horror stories of where, if you overbook yourself, you’re going to be miserable. So we’re like “we’re not going to do that, we’re going to do down, just do maybe one show a day,” and then all these shows keep coming our way and now we’re playing three shows today. It’s just, like, “ok, I guess we’re fully immersed now!”
 
So you just announced a tour with Seahaven
JC: Yeah, Seahaven and Adventures.
POZ: Are you friends with those guys? Have you played with them before?
JC: No, we’ve actually never met any of them. We know that there’s a girl in Adventures named Kimmy, and she did a shirt design for us a long time ago. That’s about as far as we have any connection with any of them. We were planning on doing a tour with Adventures, and then it just somehow worked out where Seahaven is putting out a new record, and they wanted to do a full US, and we just kind of combined all of that I believe. It worked out really well for us.
 
What else is going on for you guys right now?
JC: Well we’re working on… There’s that tour, and then we’re going to do another little summer tour after that, sometime in July.
POZ: Has that been announced yet?
JC: No it hasn’t been announced. We don’t even know, like, there’s really no details, we just know a couple of the shows have been confirmed because they’re festivals.
POZ: Is it going to be a headline tour otherwise?
JC: I think yeah, but for us a headline tour is just us going out by ourselves, maybe with somebody else.
POZ: But, as opposed to being, like, first of four openers…
JC: Yeah, yeah, right. That’ll be us. I think that’ll be a short run. And then we’ll probably do two more support tours in the fall. And then, we’re already working on a new record. After that, we’ll kind of bunker down, retreat for a while. It’s really hard to write a record while you know you’ve got tours and stuff coming up because you know you want to prepare for the tour, and so that’s always in the back of your mind. To pull yourself away from all that and get back into writing mode is really beneficial for us, because it takes us a long time to write. So yeah, that’s our year in a nutshell. Some tours and then trying to actually write another record.

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POZ Interview: A Lot Like Birds

by Zack Zarrillo - Apr 1, 2014

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PropertyOfZack Senior Writer Jesse Richman sat down with all of A Lot Like Birds SXSW a few weeks ago. We chatted with the band about SXSW, their new album No Place, Warped Tour this summer, pushing past the older drama of the “Risecore” scene, and much more. Read it all below!

by Jesse Richman

First of all, can I get your names and what you do in the band?
KT: I’m Kurt [Travis], I sing.
JA: I’m Joe [Arrington], I play the drums.
BW: I’m Ben [Wiacek], I play guitar.
CL: Cory [Lockwood]. Sing/scream.
 
So when did you guys get down here to South By?
BW: Just about an hour ago.
POZ: Oh, you just rolled in!
JA: We rolled in this morning,
BW: Rolled in, there was a confrontation right from the get-go. Things are looking up from there.
POZ: What went down?
KT: Some homeless… Well, I don’t know. He was younger. Bigger than me too. But, he insulted my wife, and so I almost had to hit him with my skateboard. I kinda did one of these things, like that [fakes motion], and he flinched and he went away.
BW: You have to type “shakes skateboard”!
CL: Kurt did a “menacing skateboard pose”!
BW: He looked “very scary”!
KT: And I said a lot of f-words and said I was gonna effin kill him…
POZ: Well at least you made it through unscathed.
Group: Yeah.
 
So you guys are playing a showcase this afternoon at the Equal Vision / Pure Noise party, and then what else do you have on tap for South By? Is that it, are you off to South By So What after this?
BW: We have one more showcase for Artery Foundation, our management company. I think it’s at the same place. It’s tomorrow.
JA: It is, same spot.
BW: We have the day off on Saturday, and then we do South By So What.
POZ: Are you guys gonna spend the day here on Saturday?
BW: I would like to, I hope so.
Group: Yeah.
POZ: Any bands you want to check out while you’re down here?
CL: We’ve been looking up shows. It’s hard to find what you’re looking for, but we found a free Childish Gambino show we want to go to. I really wanted to see St. Vincent.
JA: Yeah, we’re really mad we missed St. Vincent.
POZ: Yeah, I heard she was awesome, that’s too bad.
KT: I wanted to see Danny Brown. I think he’s doing something, but I just feel like he’s too big now.
POZ: That’s gonna be a tough one to get in to.
KT: It’ll be hard to get in. There’s a lot of fucking bands that are here, man!
JA: Sometimes it’s not even about scoping specific groups out, but just finding random stuff to see, finding something new, you know?
BW: You never know who you’re going to run into or what you’re going to see. You just kind of take in the atmosphere. Accept what’s happening to you.
 
One thing I have noticed this year — you guys just rolled in so you probably haven’t seen this much — but it feels like a lot of the bands in your scene, other than the bands playing your showcase today and the Artery one tomorrow, chose not to come to South By this year. A lot of them are just doing South By So What. It seems like it’s overtaken that part of the scene.
BW: I think a lot of that has to do with, the showcases are determined by the industry typically, or whoever’s in charge of the showcases. So I don’t know if they didn’t choose to come, because I don’t know why you wouldn’t want to.
CL: For instance, our friends in I The Mighty wanted to come hitch a ride in our van. They were like “come take us to South By! We want to be there even if we’re not playing it.”
JA: They’re recording a single, though, you know? Everyone’s got something going on. It’s also got to make sense with your schedule. Some bands… I dunno, the direction of music is changing a little bit too.

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POZ Interview: Dads

by Zack Zarrillo - Mar 28, 2014

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PropertyOfZack Senior Writer Jesse Richman sat down with John from Dads at SXSW a few weeks ago. We chatted with John about SXSW, the Woman EP and its mystique, being the Kings Of Emo and not wanting to be the Kings Of Emo again, some love for Modern Baseball, new music, and some other emo shit. Read it all below!

by Jesse Richman

To start, can I get your name and what you do?
JB: I’m John, I play drums and sing in Dads.
 
So, as one of the All American Fun Boys, how do you feel coming off of your world-conquering tour with Reggie and the Full Effect?
JB: We feel really good! We were able to go home for a week and a half; I moved into a brand new house. And then I got on a plane and flew back to Jersey, and now we’re doing this tour, and we literally play South By for three days, play Memphis TN, and then have a twelve hour drive from Memphis to Ann Arbor, MI. We did three shows in, and then we had a drive day of fourteen hours that we just did yesterday. But it’s fun! You know, I’m honestly… I was so, so, so stressed and was having a very hard time dealing with a lot of things about this tour. The second this tour started, I was just all laughs, to the point that I looked at Scott and Carly and said “why am I having so much fun? I’m supposed to hate this right now!” But it’s been great! I’m in such a good mood. I don’t know why.

Who are you out with right now?
JB: No one.
POZ: Oh! Its just you.
JB: It was literally, like, a lot of bands were kind of…
POZ: Just touring down here [to South By South West] and back?
JB: Yeah. No-one’s really having, like, successful fun. It’s just, get down here, meet everybody you need to, and get out there.
POZ: Put a little gas in the tank to get down here?
JB: Yeah, exactly.
 
So how did the tour with Reggie go? You know, Reggie is awesome, I love James’ music, but it’s not exactly an intuitive paring, he and you guys.
JB: Exactly. I feel mentally — especially after hanging out with James as long as we did — I feel mentally it’s perfect. When we got offered it, Scott and I and Carly, we’ve just all been massive Reggie fans for years. We got offered it, and it’s like, the fans of Reggie and the Full Effect are fans that come to a show looking at other bands. They found Reggie because he opened for other bands. Or because of all the other bands he was in, but they’re willing to listen to new music. When you get asked to do a support slot, it’s very risky. We thought it would be cool, but we thought it would be kind of like a “maybe this will be great, maybe it won’t.” It was insane! Beyond our beliefs. Not just the people we worked with, but how well we did, and how many Reggie fans are now Dads fans. There were a couple girls who came to the last five shows, and now they’ll come to all the Dads shows, and it’s great! It’s cool that we were able to do that, that’s the whole point of doing it, and it was a lot better than we thought it would be.
 
You guys have your own built-in fanbase, you draw pretty well. How did your fans react to Reggie? Especially the younger ones who might not have been familiar with James before.
JB: That was a funny thing, because Carly would be at the merch table on the tours before Reggie, once it was announced, and they would be like “so what is Reggie and the Full Effect?” And we were like, “you don’t know?” And we realized…
POZ; He’d been away for a while!
JB: And the younger kids don’t know! A lot of them we would tell, if we talked to them personally if they were like “I don’t know what this is, I might go,” we would be like “stay. Just watch a couple songs, if you don’t like it, fine, but give it a try.” Everyone we could talk to but didn’t care about it, we were like “just watch it.” The other scary thing about the support slot tour is these ticket prices were a lot more than a Dads show ever was. Like $13-20. And our kids were still coming out. Our fanbase was still coming out. And that was insane to me, because I was afraid that it would be like “oh these are too expensive.” But I think there’s a fanbase there that doesn’t care, they just want to see us play. That’s insane, dude!
POZ: Maybe that’s a lesson that you should be charging more!
JB: I would never want to. I would go as cheap as I could. But it’s insane to know you have a supportive fanbase who will come out even if you’re playing a 30 minute support slot.

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POZ Interview: The Used

by Zack Zarrillo - Mar 27, 2014

PropertyOfZack Senior Writer Jesse Richman sat down with Bert McCracken of The Used at SXSW a few weeks ago. We chatted with Bert about the vibe in the air surrounding Imaginary Enemy, serious addictions, moving to Australia and being an anarchist, touring, and not doing a full album tour. Check it all out below!

Welcome back to South By.
BM: Yeah, it’s cool to be here. 

Let me start out with, we did an interview here at South By two years ago. Then, like now, you had a new album coming out [2012’s Vulnerable]. I think that album, people liked it, it went over alright, but this time [the soon-to-be-released Imaginary Enemy] something feels different. Something feels bigger. It feels like people are suddenly paying more attention. Do you have any insight into why that is?
BM: That’s a good question. I’m not sure if I’m too concerned. Maybe there’s just a vibe in the air. I think that we’ve been touring a lot in the last two years since, and I think people have seen the spirit of the Used and where we’re at. We’re on this new kind of furious, inspired… We’re in one of those moments right now. It’s like a new beginning for us. A lot of bands say that when they’ve got a new record coming out, but I think the fans, and people who might take a glimpse over, are really feeling it and seeing it. We’ve had a lot of great opportunities since I saw you last, so that’s been cool.

Among the changes that have gone on, I understand you’ve sobered up since then.
BM: Yeah.

What was the motivator? What made you finally decide that was something you needed to do?
BM: My entire life was slipping through from my grasp. I was on the verge of losing everything that I loved; serious addiction will take you there. I’m an advocate for anything you can do to escape reality — I endorse drug use, and I endorse alcohol use. You just cannot stand behind the abuse of anything because it really takes peoples’ lives from them.

Is that a line you can walk personally? Can you use without abuse, or is that somewhere that you can’t go?
BM: There’s a lot of things I can do and not become an obsessed psychopath about. But alcohol is not one of them. For me, I’m way better than you and you and you and you at drinking. I’m the best there is. Take that part out of my life, and we’re all good.

You’ve got a new look going on as well. You’ve cut your hair…
BM: I needed a shower!
POZ: [laughs] Is this all part of a greater “New Bert” kind of thing?
BM: I feel like you kind of get used to things and the way they are, and it’s not even whether or not you’re into them. And also, being a serious alcoholic consumes a lot of your time. It wasn’t really a conscious… I think when I quit drinking, I looked in a mirror and was like “damn, I look like shit, so we’ll do something about it.” I think feeling healthy kind of transforms you into looking [healthy]. I live in Australia now too, and it’s really, really hard to eat unhealthy in Australia. There’s no fast food around, there’s no genetically-modified everything.

You know, the last time we talked, we spent some time talking about cooking and your passion for that. Is that something you’re still doing? 
BM: Yeah! I love creating, so anything that I possibly can create, I have a passion for. I can’t build cabinets or houses or anything like that. Building a dish, in a way, is like building a song. It’s that enjoyable. And then you get to eat it!
POZ: That’s the ultimate enjoyment!

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POZ Interview: TEAM

by Zack Zarrillo - Mar 26, 2014

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TEAM is Caleb Turman of Forever The Sickest Kids' new band with a rotating cast of other musicians you know and love. We've been hearing about the supergroup for a while now, so PropertyOfZack Senior Writer Jesse Richman decided to sit down with Turman from the band and Will Pugh from Cartel, who has been involved in writing and producing the new EP, for a new interview at South By South West this past month. 

We spoke with Caleb about the birth of the band, finally a date for a new release, a hiatus time for Forever The Sickest Kids, and more. Will also spoke up about taking the year off for Cartel, a ten year Chroma tour, and future plans. Read up on everything below!

Can I get your name and what you do in the band?
CT: I’m Caleb Turman, I play guitar and sing.
WP: I’m Will Pugh, I guess I produce and play guitar.
 
OK Will, first of all, since you were sitting in today, is this going to be an ongoing thing?
WP: We’re kind of playing it by ear. I’m in Nashville, doing production stuff, finishing up these guys’ record right now, and then when they have tours in the future, we’ll just kind of see how it works out. It would be nice, it would be fun. I enjoy playing.
 
So you guys have been pretty public that you are all recording together. Is the session done at this point? Where are things at?
CT: One of them. We just finished our newest EP. I don’t want to give out the name yet, but we just recorded it and we’re really stoked on it. I’m not gonna lie.
WP: It’s being mixed right now.
 
Do you have a release date in mind, roughly?
WP: April 11th.
 
Oh wow, it’s already nailed down and everything. Are you putting it out on your own? Are you working with somebody this time around?
CT: We’ll see. Some things are in the works. We’re playing it by ear right now. We don’t want to be too restricted. As of right now, we just want to put out what we can, when we can, you know?
 
Tell me a little bit about the recording sessions. How did they go?
CT: Oh, they’ve been amazing. Will’s been amazing. We’ve been writing a lot of the songs together, which has been an absolute treat. But yeah, they’ve been amazing. Will, you’re probably better at talking than I am.
WP: I think the songs really, from the last EP, this EP is a lot more cohesive.  Just because, the nature of the last EP was four songs they’d been doing over the course of years and then three songs that we did together in a matter of a couple months. So this one’s a lot more cohesive, it’s a progression from the last EP. And I think the songs are some of the strongest I’ve heard in a long time.
 
You guys characterized the last release as “demos,” so are you thinking of this as your “real” introduction to the world?
CT: I think so, yeah. I absolutely wouldn’t call these demos.
This is the real deal.
CT: We’ve literally bled for this. We’ve been putting a lot of hours into what we’re doing and we’re proud of it.
 
How many songs?
WP: Seven? Seven.
CT: Yeah, seven songs.
Is that everything you recorded, or is there more stuff laying around?
CT: There’s more stuff. We didn’t have time. The goal is to just keep releasing music all the time. Unfortunately we couldn’t keep going. We want to. There’s always next year!

Is an LP something you have in mind, or is it just going to be “record, release, record, release”?
CT: Eventually… An LP, I think, is a dying thing really. We’re just trying to give people something to drive to, something to jam to. Maybe, maybe not. We’ll see.

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POZ Playlist: Post-SXSW Jams

by Zack Zarrillo - Mar 25, 2014

We’re all recovered from SXSW at this point, but PropertyOfZack team members who attended the festival in Austin this year are still checking out new bands they saw while on the ground. Check out our Playlist of post-SXW jams below!

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In Defense Of South By South West

Pup - Reservoir
I am SUCH a sucker for good, solid, punk rock. I caught Pup at Charlie Says Fest and had NO idea what to expect. I actually barely made it in time for their set and got-damn! I am glad I got there. Pup is young, Canadian, and has a talent for straight up melting faces. The song Reservoir is from their self-released (soon Side One Dummy released) EP and reminds me of old AFI, surf rock, and even a little kick-back Set Your Goals? Its a weird mix but works like a charm. - (@dontmesswithatx)
The Front Bottoms - Skeleton

I am sad to admit this was my first time to catch The Front Bottoms. I actually saw them twice in one day- once at Run for Cover’s showcase and once at the Chris Gethard show! Solid day right? Skeleton is hands down my favorite track on Talon of the Hawk, and I was thrilled to hear it in their too-short set at Run for Cover. Part of the fun in seeing The Front Bottoms is watching their audience. People LOVE these guys and I have never seen a happier fan base. Happy fans make for great shows, and great shows make for great times. - (@dontmesswithatx)
Potty Mouth - Black and Studs

I caught Potty Mouth entirely coincidentally — I went to see my friend’s band Team Spirit play a showcase, and they just happened to be scheduled right before. I’m sure glad I did. “Black and Studs” takes flat, early 90’s alt-rock speak-sing and stripped-down production and undergirds it with Sarah Records melodies and a slinky, loping DIIV-y substream. The result is a song with just enough twist to confound expectations at every turn. - Jesse Richman (@jrichmanesq)
Hundred Waters - Cavity

Hundred Waters were another act I caught by accident, at a BrooklynVegan day party while waiting for Bob Nanna to take the stage, and while their highly syncopated, mathy glitchtronica (think somewhere between Purity Ring and Bjork-at-her-Bjorkiest) isn’t usually my sort of thing, the band’s unpredictable rhythmic assault and Nicole Miglis’ powerful vocals — both of which hit far harder in person than on record, where they lean a little more trip-hop — left me mesmerized. - Jesse Richman (@jrichmanesq)

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Ernie Ball