Big Stories

POZ Playlist: Team Recommendations

by Zack Zarrillo - Nov 17, 2013

image

It’s the end of the weekend again, so PropertyOfZack is back with a brand new Team Recommendations Playlist! Each weekend, different members of our team recommend both old and new songs for our viewers to listen to and enjoy. Check out our Team Playlist and listen to the songs on Spotify while reading everyone’s thoughts! 

image
Mansions - Climbers

Doom Loop is a fantastic record and shows great growth from Dig Up The Dead, an album that I love with all my heart. If you’re a Mansions fan that hasn’t listened to the new album yet, start here. If you’re not a Mansions fan that has seen me talk about Mansions 100 times because they’re the best and you still haven’t listened, start here. - Zack Zarrillo
Like Pacific – Chin Up, Hogan
 *Song is not on Spotify
Toronto pop-punk outfit Like Pacific have a pretty simple motto – “Stay pissed.” – and they stay true to form on what is easily their catchiest song. With an opening line of “And now I’m a ghost, at the bottom of Kingston Road, just west of Hell, just east of home” the track grabs one by the collar, proving once again that the power of a good pop-punk song lies in its ability to force listeners to learn the words and scream them back at you. – Zac Lomas (@Infidelegate)
The Promise Ring - Pink Chimneys

This is the time of the year that makes me miss living in Massachusetts the most. The leaves are changing, the weather is getting colder, and driving with the windows down is futile no matter how high you turn up the heat. Fall in New England is a really special place, in the general sense, as well as sentimental. Working so much, and not being able to take a trip up there has me feeling particularly stuck this year. This song has me asking myself the same question over and over again, “Where’s New England in my life?” - Dan Bassini (@danbassini)
Sum 41 - No Reason

It’s hard to believe that Sum 41’s Chuck is already coming up on its 10th birthday. Chuck was - and still is - a solid album. Though it’s one that I didn’t appreciate nearly enough when I was younger. I think it would have been a better ten year tour than Does This Look Infected? and can’t help hoping that maybe the band will come out of hiding for the occasion. - Becky Kovach (@beckystrz)
Hightide Hotel - Weekends

I’m recently getting into this band and style of music. Got this album and have been rocking it non-stop for weeks. My friends have been pushing me toward new music and this one was for sure a winner. The singer has a way to capture your attention and the chill and yet complicated instrumentals keep you hooked. Seriously great stuff. - Mike Sheffey (@SheffeyzTweetz)
Blood Orange- You’re Not Good Enough

I’ve been feeling down in the dumps, lately. There’s been so much on my mind, but Dev Hynes always knows how to cheer me up. Not that this song is emotionally uplifting or anything, but it basically tells someone that they were never good enough, so it makes you feel better. Fresh off his sophomore album “Cupid Deluxe,” this track also features Samantha Urbani of Friends. It makes you want to dance the sadness away. - Sydney Gore (@sydegee)
The Wonder Years - There, There
Depression is a funny thing — it’s a condition that actually makes you feel bad about struggling with the condition — and this song brings that conflict to life unlike any other I’ve heard. The first time I got my hands on The Greatest Generation, this opener so deeply struck a chord that I listened to it on repeat for days. Soupy has a knack for penning brutally honest lyrics, and this glimpse into the tortured thought process of someone struggling to kick depression so they’re no longer a burden to those they love is no exception. “I’m sorry I don’t laugh at the right times.” - Ali Killian (@ali_killian)

Read More

The Promise Ring Full Set From 1997

by Zack Zarrillo - Oct 1, 2013

image

A full set from The Promise Ring in 1997 in Washington, DC has been posted. Watch it below after the jump.

Read More

Friday Discussion: The Best Guest Appearances

by Zack Zarrillo - May 31, 2013

image

We all get excited to hear about guest appearances on upcoming albums that we’re looking forward to, even if they end up being terrible. Hopefully they end up being pretty damn good though. We thought it’d be great to do a PropertyOfZack Friday Discussion on The Best Guest Appearances  from multiple bands in our scene. We put the tracks together in an Rdio Playlist to listen to as you read the Discussion as well. Check out our list below and feel free to reblog with some of your favorite guest appearances!

The Wonder Years - “All My Friends Are In Bar Bands (ft. Shane Henderson, Dave Mackinder, Matty Arsenault, Jamie Rhoden, Nik Bruzzese, Charlie Saxton, Nick O’Neill)
"Defend Pop Punk," as belabored of a mantra as it is now, probably peaked in 2010, when Man Overboard slapped the trademark rifle on their debut full-length art, but The Wonder Years probably shouldered the bulk of the defending. And after The Upsides closed with the rousing "All My Friends Are in Bar Bands," us pop-punk fans should’ve just considered the genre defended.

The list of singers featured on the track still reads like a veritable who’s-who of pop-punk (If pop-punk needed defending, The Wonder Years brought an army to do it): Shane Henderson of Valencia, Dave Mackinder of Fireworks, Matty Arsenault from A Loss For Words, Title Fight’s Jamie Rhoden, and Nik Bruzzese of Man Overboard fame (oh, and Charlie Saxton, of all people). The guest spots themselves are short and sweet: everyone takes a quick step up to the microphone to sing “I’m not sad anymore / I’m just tired of this place / If this year would just end / I think we’d all be OK.” And with each emphatic delivery, you start believing it. - Erik van Rheenen

blink-182 - “All Of This (ft. Robert Smith of The Cure)”
Cataloging a band’s evolution in sound can be a fun process. “Well, it makes sense that song X sounds like this because the last song on their previous record started to go in this direction…The new album follows suit.” Or, “The guitarist in the band is new and his last band sounded like this, so here’s why that guitar part on song X sounds like this.” So on and so forth.

blink-182’s Untitled record has a lot of songs that make you question how they got there. ”All Of This” is probably the best possible example of that. It’s well known that Mark, Tom, and Travis grew up loving The Cure and Robert Smith, so being a fan of the The Cure or not, it’s rad to hear how the song came together.

The track is full of the back and forth known between blink’s vocalists, but Tom’s nasally vocals clash in a great sense with Robert Smith’s low, experienced, and calm verse and choruses. The song is the darkest sounding track on the album along with “I Miss You,” and it carries a special eeriness. “All Of This” in general is one of the songs on Untitled that proves its strength and well-roundedness. - Zack Zarrillo

Fall Out Boy - “What A Catch, Donnie (ft. Elvis Costello, Travis McCoy, William Beckett, Gabe Saporta)”
"What a Catch, Donnie" is the swan song of Fall Out Boy’s Folie a Deux. It’s not the album closer, but it is the album’s closure; a beautiful, piano-based ballad that focuses all of FOB’s talent and snark into one powerful, emotional track that seems to say everything at once about the state of FOB’s career and relationships without actually saying anything. I’ve always felt that it was one of, if not the, most important song Fall Out Boy’s ever written, and the sense of closure comes with particular obviousness in the finale.

Not only is there a reprise of a lyric from another Folie track sang beautifully by none other than Elvis Costello, there’s also a quilt of past lyrics interwoven into the end and sung by a cast of Fall Out Boy related characters, from Travie McCoy (Gym Class Heroes) to William Beckett (The Academy Is…) to Gabe Saporta (Midtown/Cobra Starship). The significance of having all your best friends proverbially in the same room to close out a song that seems indicative of the dissolution of your band is not a detail to be overlooked, and the homage paid to old lyrics could even be considered a eulogy.

Fall Out Boy has never done anything without a double entendre or a deeper meaning, and “Donnie” is no exception. Thank God this swan ending wasn’t the last drop in the pan, though - otherwise we never would have gotten Elton John on “Save Rock and Roll.” - Adrienne Fisher 

Read More

Friday Discussion: March Sadness Sad 16 Matchup Analysis

by Zack Zarrillo - Mar 8, 2013

image

We launched the Sad 16 round of March Sadness on this past Monday, and votes are still coming in strong. Voting for the Sad 16 round will end on Sunday night before the Emo 8 begins, which is why we thought it’d be a great idea to post our matchup guide and analysis for the current round of bands in the tournament. Vote here until Sunday night and make sure to check out the analysis on each band while reblogging with your comments below!

Early 90’s 1v4 Sad 16 Face-off: Jimmy Eat World vs The Promise Ring

image

Jimmy Eat World, by Josh Hammond
History: After a string of smaller but respected and recognized releases, Jimmy Eat World broke things wide open with their runaway smash Bleed American. From the strength of the release being certified Platinum, the band managed to successfully secure the respect of both the college rock crowds and major market industries. Riding the wave of the exposure, Jimmy Eat World managed to strike back and turn heads with Futures. A decade later the band still boasts one of the most steadfast fan bases in a somewhat fickle industry and proudly wears a badge of honor of being one of the most approachable and storied emo bands of all time.
Strength: With a sound embedded in raw and venerable lyrics and hook as infectious as they come, Jimmy Eat World strikes hard as the most approachable and embraced band on this list.
Weakness: Though the song “Big Casino” showed flickers of hope, the band was never truly successful in following up the wave of success they had established for themselves from the 2001-2004 period. 
Win/Lose Argument: With the possible exception of Dashboard Confessional, it is easy to state that no band has done more to popularize sad music than Jimmy Eat World.

image

The Promise Ring, by Josh Hammond
History: When 30° Everywhere dropped on Jade Tree Records in 1996, everything about music changed. The band had taken the previously established hardcore sound, which was thick and extremely repetitive, and slowed it down to a grinding and smooth pace. In that instant, the second wave of emo was born. At this point, The Promise Ring had only been a band for 9 months. They would go on to release 4 major full lengths and a number of EPs through 2002, before going on to focus on other projects.
Strength: The band is heavily credited with being responsible for popularizing and trigging the second wave of emo. They also have been said to have inspired a majority of the genre’s bands that would later follow in their foot steps.
Weakness: The band suffered from a relatively short career and often required lineup changes to survive.
Win/Lose Argument: Logically speaking, it is possible to make a very compelling argument that without The Promise Ring, emo wouldn’t exist in the form that it does today.

Early 90’s 2v3 Sad 16 Face-off: The Get Up Kids vs Sunny Day Real Estate

image

The Get Up Kids, by Adrienne Fisher
History: Since 1995, the Get Up Kids have made themselves a household name, helping to pioneer a genre wave that would give a way and inspiration to many, many other bands aiming to accomplish the same brand of melodic, accessible emo.
Strength: There’s a palpable, developing maturity that one can trace chronologically throughout GUK’s career, and because of that, there’s a wide variety of stylistic choices through all their releases onto which fans can latch - from the lower-fi, gangly sad jams on Four Minute Mile to the fleshed-out, fuller emotional rock of Guilt Show and everything in between/beyond.
Weakness: Said stylistic moves can make it difficult for a band to maintain a consistent fanbase, especially when the music, at times, edges on genres outside of the established aesthetic.
Win/Lose argument: The GUK’s March Sadness rivals, Sunny Day Real Estate, are no doubt influential and noteworthy in the antiquity of emo, but they boast a career with far less longevity and are much less accessible in the audible sense; the Get Up Kids, for instance, surely have SDRE beat on vocals alone. Matt Pryor’s warm, Midwest pipes vs. Jeremy Enigk’s wiry, tense voice? No contest.

image

Sunny Day Real Estate, by Josh Hammond
History: The band released Diary in 1994 on Sub Pop Records to a fanfare of critical and consumer praise. However, shortly after releasing the album’s follow up, LP2, the band split in favor of other projects. Reunions would follow from 1997-2001 and again from 2009 - 2011.
Strength: In their short time together Sunny Day Real Estate shifted the way emo was approached and viewed. Decades later, the band is cited as one of the most influential and game changing acts in the history of emo.
Weakness: Their career was very short lived.
Win/Lose Argument: Though slightly short lived and unstable in their career, the small window of time Sunny Day Real Estate existed opened the door for many other bands who followed. In a glance, they changed music in a giant way.

Early 00’s 1v4 Sad 16 Face-off: Brand New vs Thursday

image

Brand New, by Michael Meeze
History: Formed from the angst of Long Island, enigmatic alternative rock quartet Brand New have been mysteriously enthralling legions of fans for over twelve years with the release of four benchmark albums.
Strength: Their inscrutable nature, adaptability, flexibility, and undeniable passion.
Weakness: Their many stylistic changes have alienated some fans and their last two albums, The Devil and God Are Raging Inside Me (2006) and Daisy (2009), are challenging listens.
Win/Lose Argument: Thursday is brilliant; there is no denying that. And their overall influence on post-hardcore is defining. However, what sets a legendary band apart from an influential band is a band’s ability to connect with their fanbase on a profoundly emotional level. Brand News has done that; Thursday has not.

image

Thursday, by Adrienne Fisher
History: Gritty, humble beginnings in the basements of New Brunswick beget Thursday to many as the initial foray into the “screamo” genre movement of the early 2000s.
Strength: Unadulterated aggression courses through the continuity of their work, paired with songs that address real-world topics in the context of human emotions. Despite being pigeonholed into a silly genre name with many silly contemporaries, Thursday does “screamo” with an air of intelligence and a complete lack of cheesiness (save for maybe the countdown in “Jet Black New Year.”)
Weakness: Some of their later albums seemed unfocused and confused as they moved away from their core origin sound, and were ultimately not nearly as cherished as Full Collapse or War All the Time have come to be.
Win/lose argument: Competitors Brand New have built their legacy around mystery, intrigue and, ultimately, a lot of bullshit, attempting to alienate their fans with all cryptic everything. Thursday, however, has always been straightforward and gracious to their fanbase and acts with a genuine respect to their craft and careers, as exemplified in their humble, yet graceful, disbanding at the end of 2011.

Early 00’s 2v3 Sad 16 Face-off: Taking Back Sunday vs Saves The Day

image

Taking Back Sunday, by Michael Meeze
History: Taking Back Sunday formed in 1999 on Long Island, New York and have gone on to release five albums and numerous mainstream hits.
Strength: Their mainstream appeal, tumultuous history, malleability, and pop-sensability.
Weakness: Tumultuous history, member turnover, and allowing Flavor Flav to be in one of their music videos.
Win/Lose Argument: Wait…who is Saves the Day? While Taking Back Sunday have been pumping out classic jams such as “Cute Without the ‘E’ (Cut From the Team),” “A Decade Under the Influence,” and “MakeDamnSure” for over a decade, history has all but forgotten about the once mighty Saves the Day (who, if we’re all being honest, has not been relevant since Through Being Cool). In fact, the only thing Saves the Day has on TBS is the number of line-up changes the band has gone through over the past decade. This is a no-brainier: Taking Back Sunday.

Read More

POZ March Sadness: Sad 16 Announcement + Voting Begins

by Zack Zarrillo - Mar 4, 2013

image

We were incredibly surprised by the overall response at the announcement and vote-in round for March Sadness from both our viewers and bands participating in the competition, so we are certainly ready to launch the Sad 16 bracket round.

The 16 bands voted into March Sadness are now pitted against each other in their 90’s, Early 2000’s, Mid 2000’s, and Modern Day Emo brackets. Click “Read More” below and join us in voting for a band in each emo bracket through Sunday evening, and the Emo 8 will launch on Monday! 

Read More

Friday Discussion: March Sadness Scouting Report

by Zack Zarrillo - Mar 1, 2013

image

We launched March Sadness on Monday and it’s been incredible to see how well the POZ alternative to March Madness has been going so far. Voting for the vote-in round will end on Sunday night before the Sad 16 begins, which is why we thought it’d be a great idea to release a “stat sheet” on all 20 bands selected with information on their careers and why they were picked for March Sadness. Vote here until Sunday night and make sure to check out stats on each band while reblogging with your comments below!

image

Braid
Lifespan:
 1993-1999, 2004, 2011-present
Members: Bob Nanna, Todd Bell, Chris Broach, Damon Atkinson 
Albums: Frankie Welfare Boy Age Five, The Age Of Octeen, Frame And Canvas, Movie Music, Vol. 1 + 2, Lucky To Be Alive
Labels: Divot Records, Mud Records Polyvinyl Records, Glue Factory Records
Why They’re In March Sadness:
Braid may have not reached levels of success like The Get Up Kids or Jimmy Eat World, but the band left its mark on emo and indie-rock with its early releases, and most certainly Frame And Canvas. (ZZ)

See: Killing A Camera off Frame And Canvas

image

The Get Up Kids
Lifespan:
 1995-2005, 2008-present
Members: Matt Pryor, Jim Suptic, Rob Pope, Ryan Pope, James Dewees 
Albums: Four Minute Miles, Something To Write Home About, On A Wire, Guilt Show, There Are Rules
Labels: Doghouse Records, Vagrant Records, Quality Hill Records
Why They’re In March Sadness:
Major players in the mid-1990s emo-takeover, these blue collar Kansas City natives took the punk approach to their association with the genre. Not only did they publically denounce the idea, they also detested it. Hell, Jim Suptic even went on the record to apologize for an contribution the band might have had in influencing the bands that would follow in their foot steps. However, there is no denying the thumbprint that the band left on the emo world. They helped put Vagrant Record on the map and fueled a sound that spread the nation like wildfire. They may not have intended to light the torch, but they certainly threw gasoline on the flame. (JH)  

See: Holiday from Something to Write Home About

image

Jimmy Eat World
Lifespan:
 1993-present
Members: Jim Adkins, Tom Linton, Zach Lind (guitars), Rick Burch
Albums: Static Prevails, Clarity, Bleed American, Futures, Chase This Light, Invented 
Labels: Capitol Records, Dreamworks, Interscope Records
Why They’re In March Sadness:
With a sound embedded in raw and vunerable lyrics and hook as infectious as they come, Jimmy Eat World strikes hard as the most approachable and embraced band on this list. With Bleed American (i.e. self-titled) snagging airplay in ever major market (and many smaller markets) the band took over the world and broken the hearts of everyone in their way. With well over 2 million album sales, they without question took emo to the bigger stage and larger scale. (JH)

See: Hear You Me from Bleed American

image

The Promise Ring
Lifespan: 1995-2002, 2005, 2011-2012
Members: Davey von Bohlen, Jason Gnewikow , cott Beschta, Dan Didler
Albums: 30˚ Everywhere, Nothing Feels Good, Very Emergency, wood/water
Labels: Jade Tree Records, ANTI- Records
Why They’re In March Sadness:
Nothing Feels Good proved to be one of those records that helped define many of the bands around The Promise Ring, and helped put Jade Tree Records on the map for the label itself and the emo and hardcore bands that filled its roster. (ZZ)

See: Is This Thing On? from Nothing Feels Good

image

Sunny Day Real Estate
Lifespan: 1992-1995, 1997-2001, 2009
Members: Jeremy Enigk, Nate Mendel, William Goldsmith, Dan Hoerner
Albums: Diary, Sunny Day Real Estate, How It Feels To Be Something On, The Rising Tide
Labels: Sub Pop Records
Why They’re In March Sadness:
Diary to many is as important as Jimmy Eat World’s Clarity. Though there are so many emo bands not featured on March Sadness, Sunny Day Real Estate is one that could not be skipped over.  (ZZ)

See: Seven from Diary

image

Brand New
Lifespan: 2000-present
Members: Jesse Lacey, Vinnie Accardi, Garret Tierney, Brian Lane
Albums: Your Favorite Weapon, Deja Entendu, The Devil And God Are Raging Inside Me, Daisy
Labels: Triple Crown Records, Razor & Tie Records, Interscope Records
Why They’re In March Sadness:
Deja Entendu translates as “already heard,” which is a little ironic (don’tcha think?) since most of us got totally floored by the maturity and originality behind the powerhouse record. Sure, Your Favorite Weapon, John-Nolan beef song and all, might be more snotty and angst-driven, but Deja Entendu quantum leaped Brand New up the emo scale. Poised, poetic, and brilliantly subtle, Deja Entendu set the gold standard for emo-injected alternative rock for much of the 2000s, at least until Brand New topped themselves in sadness and quality on The Devil and God Are Raging Inside Me. (EV)

See: Me vs. Maradona. vs. Elvis from Deja Entendu 

Read More

The Promise Ring Cover Adele’s “Rumour Has It”

by Zack Zarrillo - Sep 18, 2012

The Promise Ring recently covered Adele’s “Rumour Has It” for The AV Club. Watch the cover below by clicking “Read More.”

Read More

POZ Gallery

Jun 2, 2012



PropertyOfZack Gallery : : The Bamboozle Festival 2012 (Day II)Features: The Promise Ring  Location: Asbury Park, NJ  Photos By: Hilary J. Corts




PropertyOfZack Gallery : : The Bamboozle Festival 2012 (Day II)Features: The Promise Ring  Location: Asbury Park, NJ  Photos By: Hilary J. Corts




PropertyOfZack Gallery : : The Bamboozle Festival 2012 (Day II)Features: The Promise Ring  Location: Asbury Park, NJ  Photos By: Hilary J. Corts




PropertyOfZack Gallery : : The Bamboozle Festival 2012 (Day II)Features: The Promise Ring  Location: Asbury Park, NJ  Photos By: Hilary J. Corts




PropertyOfZack Gallery : : The Bamboozle Festival 2012 (Day II)Features: The Promise Ring  Location: Asbury Park, NJ  Photos By: Hilary J. Corts




PropertyOfZack Gallery : : The Bamboozle Festival 2012 (Day II)Features: The Promise Ring  Location: Asbury Park, NJ  Photos By: Hilary J. Corts




PropertyOfZack Gallery : : The Bamboozle Festival 2012 (Day II)Features: The Promise Ring  Location: Asbury Park, NJ  Photos By: Hilary J. Corts




PropertyOfZack Gallery : : The Bamboozle Festival 2012 (Day II)Features: The Promise Ring  Location: Asbury Park, NJ  Photos By: Hilary J. Corts




PropertyOfZack Gallery : : The Bamboozle Festival 2012 (Day II)Features: The Promise Ring  Location: Asbury Park, NJ  Photos By: Hilary J. Corts




PropertyOfZack Gallery : : The Bamboozle Festival 2012 (Day II)Features: The Promise Ring  Location: Asbury Park, NJ  Photos By: Hilary J. Corts

PropertyOfZack Gallery : : The Bamboozle Festival 2012 (Day II)
Features: The Promise Ring  
Location: Asbury Park, NJ  
Photos By: Hilary J. Corts

The Promise Ring Reunion Tour Set List

by Zack Zarrillo - May 23, 2012

The Promise Ring played a reunion show in New York City two nights ago. Check out their set list below by clicking “Read More.”

Read More

The Promise Ring US Summer Tour

by Zack Zarrillo - Apr 30, 2012

The Promise Ring have added dates to their summer reunion tour. Check out the routing below by clicking “Read More.”

Read More

The Promise Ring Announce Two West Coast Dates

by Zack Zarrillo - Apr 17, 2012

The Promise Ring will be playing two shows in California this August. Check out the dates below by clicking “Read More.”

Read More

Riot Fest East Lineup Announced

by Zack Zarrillo - Mar 28, 2012

The Promise Ring, Refused, OFF!, August Burns Red, and more will be playing Riot Fest East, which will be taking place from July 19th through July 21st. Check out the poster will additional details below by clicking “Read More.”

Read More

The Promise Ring Live Performance Video

by Zack Zarrillo - Feb 28, 2012

The Promise Ring recently reunited in Milwaukee, WI for a twenty-plus song set. You can check out a performance of “Is This Thing On” below by clicking “Read More.”

Read More

The Promise Ring Reunion Set List In Milwaukee

by Zack Zarrillo - Feb 25, 2012

The Promise Ring reunited in Milwaukee, WI last night after seven years. You can check out the band’s long set list from the show below by clicking “Read More.”

Read More

The Promise Ring Oral History

by Zack Zarrillo - Feb 24, 2012

The Promis Ring has done a full oral history with the AV Club. Check out the full interview here and a short segment below by clicking “Read More.”

Read More

Ernie Ball